Saturday, July 26

The Marcels - Blue Moon (Rare & Great R&B US 1961)


Size: 65.1 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
ARtwork Included
Source: Japan 24-Bit Remaster

Blue Moon is the debut studio album by the doo-wop group The Marcels. It was released in 1961 on Colpix Records and included 12 songs. The album was available in mono, catalogue number CP-416. Blue Moon was produced and arranged by Stu Phillips and was recorded in New York at RCA Studios. Blue Moon features a cover version of the Judy Garland hit "Over The Rainbow". Four decades after the group's debut album was released, The Marcels were inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame.

lthough the album Blue Moon failed to chart on the Billboard albums chart, the first single "Blue Moon" did well. The single charted at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks, charted at No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart, sold one million copies and the group was awarded a gold disc.

The Marcels were an American doo-wop group known for turning popular music songs into rock and roll. The group formed in 1959 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and signed to Colpix Records, with lead Cornelius Harp, bass Fred Johnson, Gene Bricker, Ron Mundy, and Richard Knauss. The group was named after a popular hair style of the day, the marcel wave, by Fred Johnson's younger sister Priscilla.

In 1961 many were surprised to hear a new version of the ballad "Blue Moon", that began with the bass singer saying, "bomp-baba-bomp" and "dip-da-dip." The record sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. It is featured in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.

The disc went to number one in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, and UK Singles Chart. In the U.S., additional revivals in the same vein as "Blue Moon" – "Heartaches" and "Melancholy Baby" – were less successful, although "Heartaches" peaked at No. 7 on the Billboard Hot 100 and eventually sold over one million copies worldwide.

The Marcels - US Single 1961
In August 1961, due to problems encountered in the Deep South while touring because of the group being bi-racial, the white members, Knauss and Bricker left and were replaced by Allen Johnson (brother of Fred) and Walt Maddox. Mundy left soon after, leaving the group a quartet. In 1962, Harp and Allen Johnson left, and were replaced by Richard Harris and William Herndon. There was a brief reunion of the original members in 1973. The group made several recordings in 1975 with Harp back on lead. Original member Gene Bricker died in 1983. Allen Johnson died in 1995. Their original lead singer, Cornelius Harp, died in 2013. [Wikipedia]

This Pittsburgh ensemble deserved a much better fate than being known primarily for a novelty-tinged cover of "Blue Moon." Baritone vocalist Richard F. Knauss teamed with Fred Johnson, Gene J. Bricker, Ron Mundy, and lead vocalist Cornelius Harp to form an integrated ensemble. They named themselves after Harp's hairstyle, the marcel. 

The Marcels - Swedish EP 1961
The group did a string of covers as demo tapes that were sent to Colpix. The label's A&R director had them cut several oldies at RCA's New York studios in 1961, one of them being "Blue Moon." 

They used the bass intro arrangement from the Cadillacs' "Zoom" and the result was a huge hit. It eventually topped both the pop and R&B charts, and also was an international smash. The group eventually appeared in the film Twist Around the Clock with Dion and Chubby Checker, and recorded an 18-cut LP for Colpix. Alan Johnson and Walt Maddox later replaced Knauss and Gene Bricker, making the Marcels an all-black unit. The group did score another Top Ten pop single with "Heartaches," another cover of a pre-rock single. This peaked at number seven pop and number 19 R&B in 1961. They continued recording on Kyra, Queen Bee, St. Clair, Rocky, and Monogram with varying lineups, but never again equaled their past success. [AMG]

01. "Blue Moon" 02:17
02. "Goodbye To Love" 02:35
03. "Sweet Was The Wine" 02:10
04. "Peace Of Mind" 02:34
05. "A Fallen Tear" 02:39
06. "Over The Rainbow" 02:40
07. "I'll Be Forever Loving You" 02:21
08. "Two People In The World" 02:22
09. "Most Of All" 02:12
10. "Teeter Totter Love" 02:02
11. "Sunday Kind Of Love" 02:22
12. "Crazy Bells" 02:21

1. The Marcels
.



Wednesday, July 23

Spirit - Paramount Theatre Washington KSIW-1971 (Bootleg)



Size: 196 MB
Bitrate: 320
mp3
Found in a garbage Can
Some Artwork

Spirit was a highly regarded rock band that achieved modest commercial success, charting 11 albums in the U.S. between 1968 and 1977. Founded in Los Angeles in 1967 by musicians who had a mixture of rock, pop, folk, blues, classical, and jazz backgrounds, and who ranged in age from 16 to 44, the group had an eclectic musical style in keeping with the early days of progressive rock; they were as likely to play a folk ballad featuring fingerpicked acoustic guitar, a jazz instrumental full of imaginative improvisation, or a driving rhythm tune dominated by acid rock electric guitar playing. The diverse tastes of the original quintet produced a hybrid style that delighted a core audience of fans but proved too wide-ranging to attract a mass following, and at the same time the musicians' acknowledged talents brought them other opportunities that led to the breakup of the original lineup after four years and four albums, then kept them from committing fully to regroupings as their music began to be recognized in later years. 

Spirit - Clear Spirit Advertise 1969
While two bandmembers, singer/guitarist Randy California and drummer Ed Cassidy, maintained the Spirit name, the others came and went as their schedules allowed, such that the group never fulfilled its early promise, although, as a vehicle for California's songwriting and guitar playing, it continued to produce worthwhile music until his death.

Randy California was born Randolph Craig Wolfe on February 20, 1951, in Los Angeles, CA. His mother, Bernice Pearl, was the sister of Ed Pearl, who owned the Ash Grove, a nightclub in Hollywood, and California, who began playing guitar as a child, grew up listening carefully to the folk, blues, and jazz musicians who performed there. In early 1965, the Rising Sons, a folk-blues group featuring Taj Mahal and Ry Cooder, played the Ash Grove; the band's drummer was Ed Cassidy (born May 4, 1923, in Chicago, IL; died December 6, 2012, in San Jose, CA), who met and married California's recently divorced mother, becoming his stepfather. Cassidy had been drumming professionally since his teens in almost every conceivable style, though lately largely in jazz groups before he joined the Rising Sons. He left the band after injuring his wrist during a solo.

Meanwhile, California had met two aspiring musicians from the San Fernando Valley, singer/percussionist Jay Ferguson (born John Arden Ferguson, February 5, 1947, in Burbank, CA) and bassist Mark Andes (born February 19, 1948, in Philadelphia, PA) at a folk music camp, and in September 1965, along with Cassidy and a second guitarist, they formed a band called the Red Roosters that played the Ash Grove.

Spirit Advertise 1970
The Red Roosters broke up when Cassidy moved his family to New York in search of work in the spring of 1966. There California had a fateful encounter with another guitarist at a music store in Manhattan; he met the then-unknown Jimi Hendrix, who was going by the name Jimmy James, and who invited him to join his band, Jimmy James & the Blue Flames, which was appearing at the Café Wha? in Greenwich Village. Since there was already a musician named Randy in the band, bass player Randy Palmer, Hendrix distinguished the two by their home states, calling Palmer "Randy Texas" and Randy Wolfe "Randy California," which he subsequently retained as a stage name. California played with Hendrix that summer, which was when Hendrix was spotted by Animals bassist Chas Chandler, who became his manager and took him to England to form the Jimi Hendrix Experience. Hendrix asked California to go to England with him, but at 15 he was too young. Instead, California moved back to his home state with his mother and stepfather.

Spirit - German Single 1969
After returning west, California and Cassidy formed a band called Spirits Rebellious, after a book by the religious mystic Kahlil Gibran, also featuring pianist John Locke (born September 23, 1943, in Los Angeles, CA; died August 4, 2006, in Ojai, California), who had played with Cassidy previously in the New Jazz Trio. In the spring of 1967, California and Cassidy ran into Ferguson and Andes, who had continued to work as musicians while attending UCLA. After the demise of the Red Roosters, they had a band called Western Union, also including Andes' guitar-playing brother, Matt Andes, then Ferguson had tried to launch a solo career while Mark Andes served brief tenures with Yellow Balloon and Canned Heat. Now, they joined Spirits Rebellious, a name soon shortened to Spirit. By June, they were playing gigs and looking for a record contract. With Barry Hansen (later known as Dr. Demento, the novelty-song radio host) producing, they cut a demo tape. They also auditioned for record executive and producer Lou Adler. Adler, best known for his work with the Mamas & the Papas and his company Dunhill Records, had sold Dunhill to ABC Records and formed a new label, Ode Records, which had a distribution deal with Epic Records, an imprint of the major label CBS Records. Adler signed Spirit to Ode in August 1967.

SpiritAdler produced the self-titled debut album Spirit, which was released in January 1968. (Most of the songs were written by Ferguson, though California contributed a delicate instrumental called "Taurus" that would prove inspirational to Led Zeppelin, which based the introduction to the 1971 standard "Stairway to Heaven" on it.) 

Spirit - Billboard Advertise 1972
Spurred by the single "Mechanical World," which had some regional success, the LP entered the Billboard chart in April and spent more than six months there, peaking in the Top 40 in September. Spirit toured extensively while working on their second album and preparing a score for French director Jacques Demy's film Model Shop (January 1969), in which they also appeared. (Sundazed Records belatedly released a soundtrack album from the film in 2005.) In October 1968, they issued a single, "I Got a Line On You," a driving rocker written by California. Peaking at number 25 in the Hot 100 in March 1969, it was the group's only Top 40 single. The second album, The Family That Plays Together, followed in December 1968. With the hit single spurring sales, it peaked at number 22 in March 1969. (Ferguson again dominated the songwriting, penning six of the 11 tracks, although California wrote or co-wrote the other five.)

Clear With the accelerated schedules typical of record releases in the 1960s, Spirit had to have another album ready quickly, and Clear appeared in July 1969. The album led off with the California/Ferguson composition "Dark Eyed Woman," another rocker in the "I Got a Line on You" mold that was released as a single but did not hit; the LP also contained material written for the Model Shop score that, not surprisingly, sounded like background music. 

Spirit - Billboard Magazine Advertise 1968
Clear was a disappointment after the success of The Family That Plays Together, peaking at number 55 in October. In December, the band released a one-off single, California's "1984," and it gave early indications of becoming a hit, rising to number 69 by March 1970 before radio became resistant to its ominous lyrics, which referred to the dystopian novel of the same name by George Orwell. Produced by the band itself, it was their last release on Ode. Adler had negotiated a split from CBS in order to move his label to A&M Records, and in so doing he agreed to leave Spirit with Epic. The band then hired David Briggs, who had worked on Neil Young's albums, to produce its fourth LP. Sessions for that album commenced in April 1970, but they were interrupted when California suffered a fractured skull due to a fall from a horse and spent a month in the hospital. A single, Ferguson's "Animal Zoo," emerged in July and grazed the bottom of the charts, but it ultimately took six months to complete the LP, released as Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus in November.

FeedbackSpirit toured in support of the album during the winter and spring of 1971, but Epic failed to break a successful single from the LP, and it peaked at number 63 in February. Ferguson and Andes, frustrated at the band's lack of broad commercial success, quit Spirit to form a new band, Jo Jo Gunne, with Matt Andes and drummer Curly Smith. Initially, Spirit hired bassist John Arliss and played as a quartet. Then, California quit to launch a solo career. Remaining members Cassidy and Locke brought in two new musicians, brothers Al Staehely (bass) and Chris Staehely (guitar), and in November they began recording a new Spirit album. 

Spirit Album 1968
It appeared in February 1972 under the title Feedback. Like Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus, it peaked at number 63 in the charts. When Cassidy left the band, followed by Locke, the Staehely brothers brought in a drummer and briefly toured as Spirit. They didn't get away with that for long, but it was easy to see why promoters were interested in having a Spirit band on the road, no matter who was in it. Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus, though off the charts, had become an FM radio favorite and a perennial seller (it would be certified as a gold record in 1976), and Epic re-released The Family That Plays Together, which reentered the charts in July 1972.

Meanwhile, California had signed a solo contract with Epic and in the fall of 1972 he released his debut album, Kapt. Kopter & the (Fabulous) Twirly Birds. He reconnected with Cassidy, and the two hired a bass player, Larry "Fuzzy" Knight, to tour Europe during the spring of 1973. They also worked on a concept album called Potatoland, but Epic rejected it, and California temporarily dropped out of the music business and moved to Hawaii. Epic released a compilation album, The Best of Spirit, in the summer of 1973 and saw it reach the charts along with a single release of "Mr. Skin," a song from Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus that was a sly allusion to Cassidy's shaved head. Epic also released a two-fer LP combination of Spirit and Clear, and it too got into the charts. Responding to the resulting demands for a live act, Cassidy, having reacquired legal right to the name Spirit from the Staehely brothers, teamed up again with Knight and added some side musicians to hit the road from July 1973 to April 1974.

Spirit Advertise August 1972
After the dissolution of that unit, Cassidy traveled to Hawaii and got back in touch with California. Joined by Mark Andes, who had left Jo Jo Gunne, they began playing dates by September 1974; Locke also performed with them at the start of 1975, but neither he nor Andes stayed permanently. Instead, California and Cassidy hired another bass player, Barry Keene, and carried on. They recorded an album that they shopped, signing to Mercury Records, which released the double LP Spirit of '76 in May 1975. It made the lower reaches of the charts. They quickly followed in October with Son of Spirit, another modest seller. For Farther Along, released in June 1976, they were again joined by Andes and Locke, as well as Matt Andes. The album spent several weeks in the charts, and in August Ferguson, who had folded Jo Jo Gunne and was preparing a solo career, rejoined for a few shows, marking the first reunion of the original quintet in five years. He did not stay, however, and Mark Andes, who had already launched his new band Firefall, also departed, as did Locke. Once again California and Cassidy engaged a bassist, John Turlep, to continue as a trio.

SPIRIT,   Paramount Theatre, Seattle, Washington 
KSIW-Broadcast 1971. It's a Radio-Broadcast-Show. The Sound Quality is near excellent. 
Hey Joe is incredible. 

Randy California - guitar, vocals
 Ed Cassidy - drums, percussion
 John Locke - keyboards
 John Arliss - bass  

Disc One
01. Radio Comment > Something You Must Say (9:40) 
02. Nature's Way (2:53)
03. Just Care About Me (8:02) 
04. Hey Joe (9:02)
05. Improvisation (11:32) 
06. Veruska (3:15)

Disc Two 
01. Going Away Somewhere (5:23)
02. Tow The Line (5:46)
03. It's All The Same (14:29)
04. I Got A Line On You (3:52)
05. Set Me Free / Comment (9:33)

1. Spirit Live 1971
or
2. Spirit Live 1971
.
Spirit Concert Poster
(Sound Factory Sacramento 1968)

Monday, July 21

Johnny Winter - Texas International Pop Festival 1969 + Bonus Concert



Size: 99.4 MB
Bitrate: 320
mp3
Found in OuterSpace 
No Artwork

The Texas International Pop Festival was a music festival held at Lewisville, Texas, on Labor Day weekend, August 30 to September 1, 1969. It occurred two weeks after Woodstock. The site for the event was the newly-opened Dallas International Motor Speedway, located on the east side of Interstate Highway 35E, across from the Round Grove Road intersection.

Johnny Winter - UK Single May 1969
The festival was the brainchild of Angus G. Wynne III, son of Angus G. Wynne, the founder of the Six Flags Over Texas Amusement Park. Wynne was a concert promoter who had attended the Atlanta International Pop Festival on the July Fourth weekend. He decided to put a festival on near Dallas, and joined with the Atlanta festival's main organizer, Alex Cooley, forming the company Interpop Superfest.

Artists performing at the festival were: Led Zeppelin, B.B. King, Canned Heat, Chicago (then called Chicago Transit Authority), Delaney and Bonnie and Friends, Freddie King, Grand Funk Railroad, Herbie Mann, Incredible String Band, James Cotton, Janis Joplin, Johnny Winter, Nazz, Rotary Connection, Sam and Dave, Santana, Shiva's Headband, Sly and the Family Stone, Space Opera, Spirit, Sweetwater, Ten Years After and Tony Joe White.

North of the festival site was the campground on Lewisville Lake, where hippie attendees skinny-dipped and bathed. Also on the campground was the free stage, where some bands played after their main stage gig and several bands not playing on the main stage performed. It was on this stage that Wavy Gravy, head of the Hog Farm commune, acquired his name. (At Woodstock, he was Hugh Romney.)

The Merry Pranksters, Ken Kesey's group, was in charge of the free stage and camping area. While Kesey was neither at the Texas event nor at Woodstock, his right hand man, Ken Babbs, and his psychedelic bus, Further (Furthur) were. The Hog Farm provided security, a trip tent, and free food.

Attendance at the festival remains unknown, but is estimated between 120,000 and 150,000. As with Woodstock, there were no violent crimes reported. There was one death, due to heatstroke, and one birth.

High-quality soundboard bootleg recordings of almost the entire festival are circulated on the internet.[8] Led Zeppelin's set is one of the most popular Led Zeppelin bootlegs due to the high technical and musical quality of the performance.

Texas International Pop Festival 
Dallas, TX, 1 September 1969

Johnny Winter: Vocals, Guitar
Tommy Shannon: Fender Bass
Uncle John Turner: Drums

01. Introduction
02. Mean Town Blues
03. Black Cat Bone
04. Mean Mistreater
05. Talk To Your Daughter
06. Leland Mississippi Blues (titled: Look Up)
07. I Can Love You Baby) (faded out)

Bonus Concert:

Johnny Winter - 2nd Album
John Dawson Winter III (February 23, 1944 – July 16, 2014), known as Johnny Winter, was an American blues guitarist, multi-instrumentalist, singer, and producer. Best known for his high-energy blues-rock albums and live performances in the late 1960s and 1970s, Winter also produced three Grammy Award-winning albums for blues singer and guitarist Muddy Waters. After his time with Waters, Winter recorded several Grammy-nominated blues albums. In 1988, he was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame and in 2003, he was ranked 63rd in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time".

When Johnny Winter emerged on the national scene in 1969, the hope, particularly in the record business, was that he would become a superstar on the scale of Jimi Hendrix, another blues-based rock guitarist and singer who preceded him by a few years. That never quite happened, but Winter did survive the high expectations of his early admirers to become a mature, respected blues musician with a strong sense of tradition.

He was born John Dawson Winter III in Leland, Mississippi, on February 23, 1944, and as an infant moved to Beaumont, Texas, where his brother Edgar Winter was born on December 28, 1946; both brothers were albinos. They turned to music early on, Johnny Winter learning to play the guitar, while Edgar Winter took up keyboards and saxophone. Before long they were playing professionally, and soon after that recording singles for small local record labels. Both of them were members of Johnny & the Jammers, whose 45 "School Day Blues"/"You Know I Love You" was released by Dart Records in 1959. 

1975 Poster
Other singles, either credited to Winter or some group pseudonym, were released over the next several years, including "Gangster of Love"/"Eternally," initially issued by Frolic Records in 1963 and picked up for national distribution by Atlantic Records in 1964, and "Gone for Bad"/"I Won't Believe It," also a 1963 Frolic single that was licensed by MGM Records in 1965. Winter had his first taste of chart success with a version of "Harlem Shuffle," recorded by the Traits, which was released by Universal Records, then picked up by Scepter Records and spent two weeks in the Billboard Hot 100 in November 1966. 

In 1968, Winter decided to focus exclusively on blues-rock, and he formed a trio with Tommy Shannon on bass and John "Red" Turner on drums. He signed with the Austin, Texas, label Sonobeat Records, and in August cut The Progressive Blues Experiment, released locally. His life was changed irrevocably with the publication of the December 7, 1968, issue of Rolling Stone magazine, which contained an article by Larry Sepulvado and John Burks about the Texas music scene. "The hottest item outside of Janis Joplin," they wrote, "… remains in Texas. 

If you can imagine a hundred and thirty-pound cross-eyed albino with long fleecy hair playing some of the gutsiest fluid blues guitar you have ever heard, then enter Johnny Winter." Among those who read the article was New York club owner Steve Paul, who hopped a plane to Texas and convinced Winter to hire him as manager. 

Advertise 1974
Paul set up a bidding war among major record labels that was won in February 1969 by CBS Records, which signed Winter for an advance of $600,000, the largest sum the label had ever paid to a new solo artist. 

Winter quickly went into a recording studio with his band to cut his debut for CBS' Columbia label, but in the meantime other labels discovered that he had made a lot of recordings in his youth, and they began buying or leasing the early material. Imperial Records bought The Progressive Blues Experiment from Sonobeat and re-released it in March 1969; it entered the charts and peaked at number 40. Winter's Columbia debut, titled Johnny Winter, was released on April 15 and peaked at number 23. In August, GRT Records released The Johnny Winter Story, consisting of material recorded in the early ‘60s; it got to number 111. In October, Buddah Records followed with First Winter, and Janus Records released About Blues in November. (Unfortunately, repackagings of Winter's early recordings continued to litter his discography throughout his career.)

Meanwhile, Winter appeared at the Woodstock festival in August 1969. (In 2009, The Woodstock Experience, an album of his performance, was released.) His second Columbia album, Second Winter, was released in November 1969 and reached number 55. In the spring of 1970, he disbanded his trio and enlisted the former members of the McCoys to back him: Rick Derringer (guitar), Randy Jo Hobbs (bass), and Randy Z. (drums). 

Johnny Winter
Billboard Review September 1970
The group was dubbed "Johnny Winter And." Their self-titled album was released in September and peaked at a disappointing number 154, but they followed with a concert collection, Live Johnny Winter And, released in February 1971, and it reached number 40; in 1974, it was certified gold. (In 2010, Collectors' Choice Music released another concert recording from the Johnny Winter And band, Live at the Fillmore East 10/3/70.)

Winter was not able to capitalize on the career momentum generated by the success of Live Johnny Winter And. He had become addicted to heroin and suffered from suicidal depression, as a result of which he suspended his career and went home to Beaumont. In this age before rehabilitation clinics, he was hospitalized, initially in Beaumont and then, for nine months, at River Oaks Hospital in New Orleans. His next appearance on disc was as a guest on Roadwork, the live album released by Edgar Winter's White Trash in March 1972, which was preceded by Edgar Winter's introduction in which he said people kept asking him, "Where's your brother?" Johnny Winter was not able to return to action full-time until the release of his comeback album, Still Alive and Well, in March 1973. The album, which featured "Silver Train," a song specially written for Winter by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, peaked at number 22. 
Winter returned to touring. His next album, Saints & Sinners, appeared in February 1974 and peaked at number 42. Before the year was out, he had another one ready, and John Dawson Winter III, featuring "Rock & Roll People," a song specially written for Winter by John Lennon, was released in November, peaking at number 78. 

For Captured Live!, Winter was transferred to a Steve Paul-created custom label within CBS, Blue Sky Records. The album was released in February 1976 and peaked at number 93. Edgar Winter was also on Blue Sky, and the brothers combined for a live album, Together, released in June, which peaked at number 89. 

Johnny Winter
Billboard Reviw March 1971
Veteran bluesman Muddy Waters was signed to Blue Sky, and Winter became his producer on a comeback LP, Hard Again, released in February 1977. It won the Grammy Award for Best Blues Album. Winter toured with Waters' band, then took them into the studio for his next album, Nothin' But the Blues, released in July 1977. It peaked at number 146. Another Winter-produced Waters album, I'm Ready, came out in February 1978 and was another Grammy winner. Winter returned to working with his usual band for his next album, White, Hot & Blue; the album, released in July 1978, got to number 141. Raisin' Cain, recorded in more of a rock mode, appeared in March 1980 and failed to chart, concluding Winter's CBS contract. 

Winter signed to the independent blues label Alligator Records, for which he made Guitar Slinger, released in May 1984. It returned him to the charts, and its follow-up, Serious Business (September 1985) was another chart entry. He completed his commitment to Alligator with 3rd Degree (November 1986). He was then signed by Voyager Records, distributed by MCA Records, for The Winter of '88 (October 1988). The album represented an attempt to take him in the more commercial direction of ZZ Top's synthesized blues-boogie, but the attempt backfired, and the album did not chart. Winter returned to more of a straight-ahead blues approach after signing to Virgin Records' Point Blank/Charisma imprint on his next album, Let Me In (July 1, 1991). He followed it with Hey, Where's Your Brother? (November 3, 1992). 

Winter focused more on concert work than recording after the early '90s. For Live in NYC 1997 (March 10, 1998), he had fans vote on the tracks to be included. Six years passed before the release of I'm a Bluesman (June 15, 2004). Winter inaugurated a series of archival concert collections on Friday Music with Live Bootleg Series, Vol. 1 (October 9, 2007), which was followed by Vol. 2 (March 4, 2008), Vol. 3 (July 29, 2008), Vol. 4 (February 10, 2009), and Vol. 5 (June 30, 2009). Meanwhile, a concert appearance resulted in his first new album in five years, Live at the 2009 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, released by Munck Mix on December 15, 2009. On January 12, 2010, he released Live Bootleg Series, Vol. 6. In September 2010, he announced that he had signed to Megaforce Records. His label debut, Roots, appeared in 2011.

Johnny Winter And
Konserthuset, Stockholm  
Sweden 1 February 1971

Johnny Winter: Guitar, Vocals  
 Rick Derringer: Guitar  
 Randy Hobbs: Bass  
 Bobby Caldwell: Drums.

01. Good Morning Little School Girl 4:26
02. Rock´n Roll Hootchie Coo 5:24
03. Be Careful With A Fool> It's My Own Fault 18:10
04. Jumping Jack Flash 5:18
05. Great Balls of Fire> Whole Lotta Shaking Going On[fade out] 20:57

Part 1: Johnny Winter 1
Part 2: Johnny Winter 2
or
Part 1: Johnny Winter 1
Part 2: Johnny Winter 2
.
Still Alive and Well Advertise Poster 1973

Thursday, July 17

Ratdog - Live at The Pearl Concert Theatre May 7, 2014 (Bootleg)


Size: 298 MB
Bitrate: 320
mp3
Found in "Internet Music Archive"
Link at my site
Some Artwork
Very good sound quality

RatDog (sometimes known as Bob Weir & RatDog or Ratdog), is an American rock band. The group began as a side project for Grateful Dead rhythm guitarist Bob Weir and bassist Rob Wasserman.[dead link] After the Grateful Dead disbanded in December 1995, following the death of Jerry Garcia on August 9, 1995, RatDog became Bob Weir's primary band. They perform Grateful Dead tunes primarily with a mixture of covers (including Bob Dylan and Chuck Berry), along with some originals. RatDog's repertoire currently consists of over 150 songs.



Throughout 2009 and 2010, original RatDog members Bob Weir, Rob Wasserman, and Jay Lane periodically performed under the moniker Scaring the Children. From 2010 through 2013, the number of RatDog's performances were limited while Weir toured with Furthur. Ratdog played 2 shows in both January 2012 and August 2013. In September 2013 it was revealed by Primus bassist Les Claypool that RatDog would be "getting back together this next year", as Lane had chosen to leave Primus in order to rejoin RatDog. Ratdog returned to extensive touring in 2014 with Steve Kimock on lead guitar and the unusual arrangement of two bassists in the mix. Robin Sylvester and original Ratdog bassist Rob Wasserman share the stage. Jay Lane, original member, and Jeff Chimenti, long-time member, are back. The return tour in 2014 began on Valentine's Day in Philadelphia.


It started out with Rob Wasserman and me as a duo and we played that way for six or eight years, and then one day I was working on a project and we needed a drummer. And Rob said, 'I know this drummer that I met last night and he was pretty good. You want me to give him a buzz?' and I said, 'Sure.'

And so Jay [Lane] came up and did this session with us. The next morning, I called Rob and said 'Hey, listen. That was kind of fun yesterday. How bout we take a drummer on our next tour?' and he said he was just thinking the same thing.

"We started working together and booked another tour, and we were working with Jay at the time and we were about to go out on tour and my old pal Matthew Kelly came through town. And he was just sort of footloose and I said 'Hey, you want to come out with us? You want to come sit in with us?' And that worked so we had a little quartet and we took that on the road."

JEFF CHIMENTI
eff (last name pronounced "key-men-tee") studied classical piano from the time he seven years old until his interest in jazz and improvisational playing grew during his high school years.

After years of playing with various jazz acts like the Dave Ellis Quartet and touring with En Vogue, Jeff joined RatDog in 1997.

Since then he's been in high demand, appearing with Alphabet Soup, Phil and Friends, The Other Ones, The Dead, and Furthur. (source: dead.net)


STEVE KIMOCK
A master of improvisation for nearly four decades, Steve Kimock has been inspiring music fans with his transcendent guitar speak, voiced through electric, acoustic, lap and pedal steel guitars. While one can say that his genre is rock, no one niche has ever confined him. Instead, through the years, he's explored various sounds and styles based on what's moved him at the time, whether it's blues or jazz; funk or folk; psychedelic or boogie; gypsy or prog-rock; traditional American or world fusion.

Threaded through this expansive and highly nuanced musical landscape is Kimock's signature sound, the prodigious product of his ability to articulate crystal-clear tone, melody and emotion into intricately woven music crafted with technical brilliance. His passion and devotion to performing live is matchless, and his unparalleled ability to embrace and capture his audiences musically is the stuff of legends. (source: Steve Kimock website)

JAY LANE
Jay's roles on drums have earned him a place in San Francisco's music history. He started performing in the Bay Area in the early 1980s with childhood friend and current Spearhead guitarist Dave Shul before moving onto gigs with The Uptones, a ska band he was introduced to by childhood friend Dave Ellis, and The Freaky Executives. The latter shared rehearsal space with Les Claypool, who invited Jay to join his band, Primus, who he has played on and off with ever since.



Jay co-founded the pioneering hip hop/jazz group Alphabet Soup with saxophonist Kenny Brooks, New York keyboardist Dred Scott, and rappers Chris Burgerand Zachariah Mose. Alphabet Soup recorded two albums—1994's Layin' Low in the Cut and 1996's Strivin'—and shot a video that featured regularly on BET. Also during those years Jay reunited with old friends—seven-string guitarist Charlie Hunter and sax man Dave Ellis—to form the original Charlie Hunter Trio.

During Jay's tenure with the Charlie Hunter Trio, Jay started playing with Bob Weir and Rob Wasserman in a side project that would eventually become RatDog.

In addition to playing with RatDog for the past 19 years, Jay has been named Drummer of the Year at the California Music Awards, toured with various Claypool projects, played with Alphabet Soup, co-founded The Band of Brotherz and Jay's Happy Sunshine Burger Joint, and toured with Furthur and Scaring the Children.


ROBIN SYLVESTER
Robin Sylvester, born in London, lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, and is best known for his work with Bob Weir & RatDog. Although primarily a bass player, he plays several instruments, including guitar and keyboards, and has also done extensive arranging.

He began his professional music career with the a capella London Boy Singers chorus in the 1950s, and worked as a sound engineer in 1960s and 1970s in all the great studios in London, including Abbey Road. Inspired by Paul McCartney to play bass, he also used early synthesizers while playing with and producing Byzantium in 1971.

While touring with Dana Gillespie, he moved to the US in 1974. Clive Davis signed his folk rock band The Movies to Arista Records, which played in NY and LA in the late 70s. As a session musician, he worked alongside Steve Douglas, backing The Beach Boys and Ry Cooder. He also played in live acts led by Marty Balin, Mary Wells, The Shirelles, The Coasters, The Drifters, Billy Preston, Christine McVie, Steve Seskin, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry, Freddy Fender, Del Shannon and Vince Welnick’s Missing Man Formation.

In 2003, he joined Bob Weir & RatDog and also plays occasionally with jambands Ghosts of Electricity, Melvin Seals & JGB, David Nelson & Friends, Jemimah Puddleduck and The Rubber Souldiers. (source: Sweet Relief)


ROB WASSERMAN
Precious few musicians demonstrate the scope to be dubbed renaissance men, but Rob Wasserman has more than earned the title. His daunting versatility has made him one of the last two decade's most in-demand bassists -- as demonstrated by recording and touring stints with Lou Reed, Van Morrison, and Elvis Costello. His longtime creative partnership with Grateful Dead members Jerry Garcia and Bob Weir have yielded a trove of fertile sounds. And, last but far from least, the albums issued under his own name have won awards from sources in the jazz, pop and rock fields.

That acclaim has much to do with Wasserman's unflagging devotion to artistic purity and the value of real musicianship. Trained at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, he developed a style of upright bass playing that he likens to cello, more than standard bass methodology. He's put that ability to the test in a variety of contexts over the years, most notably on a series of three albums -- SOLO, DUETS, and TRIOS -- that demonstrate his unparalleled knack for making his voice heard without shouting, for allowing the collaborative process to flower to its fullest. (source: Rob Wasserman website)


BOB WEIR
A founding member of the Grateful Dead, Bob's musical legacy (separate from its cultural implications) will be of an utterly strange rhythm guitar player and songwriter who grew up in one of the most lasting outside bands of the 1960s. Playing with the Dead until their dissolution following the death of Jerry Garcia in 1995, Bob has since made his primary musical home in RatDog.

Born in 1947 and adopted by a rich California engineer, Bob's dyslexia gave him trouble at school. He was labeled a troublemaker and shipped off to boarding school, where he met future songwriting partner John Perry Barlow. After being kicked out of the school, Bob returned to the Bay Area, where he bummed around the burgeoning folk scene and came into contact with musicians like Jerry Garcia, New Riders on the Purple Sage founder David Nelson, and Jefferson Airplane guitarist Jorma Kaukonen. A series of jug bands eventually morphed into the electrified Warlocks who, in turn, became the Grateful Dead.

Bob developed his odd rhythm style playing between the sweet, articulated lead guitar of Jerry Garcia and the avant-garde bass lines of Phil Lesh. Like a jazz guitarist, Bob was often not evident in the mix, but still a profound shape on the sound.


Bob's earliest songwriting efforts mirrored those of Garcia and Lesh, though less successfully. By the early '70s, he had crossed paths with Barlow again and the two began their creative relationship in earnest. Soon, Bob was producing songs in his own distinct style—a blend of Americana and the odd voicings he specialized in. As the health of Dead frontman Ron "Pigpen" McKernan waned, Bob found his rich baritone increasingly at the center of attention and developed a stage personality to match it. His first solo album, Ace, released in 1972, featured Bob backed by the rest of the Dead.

Through the late '70s, and especially during the Dead's year off in 1975, Bob toured and recorded with a number of groups, including Kingfish and Bobby and the Midnites. As Jerry's dependence on drugs increased during the Dead's later days, Bob found himself increasingly in the position of de facto bandleader.

When Jerry died in 1995, Bob had recently formed RatDog. In addition to consistently touring with RatDog since then, Bob reunited with several former Dead bandmates for tours in 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2004, and 2009. He continues to play with countless artists of varying styles and talents. (source: Billboard)

RatDog - Bob Weir
Pearl Concert Theater
Las Vegas, NV 07-05-2014

01. U.S. Blues  06:21
02. Hey Pocky Way  09:55
03. Big Boss Man  08:30
04. Loser  11:55
05. I Need a Miracle  10:16
06. Stella Blue (instrumental)  11:55
07. Not Fade Away  10:38
08. The Music Never Stopped  14:57
09. Dear Prudence  09:15
10. Shakedown Street  15:07
11. Ramble On Rose  10:06
12. Minglewood Blues  09:33
13. Ovation  01:41

Part 1: Link
Part 2: Link

Monday, July 14

The Angels - My Boyfriend's Back (Great R&B US 1963)



Size: 63.4 MB
Bitrate: 256
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Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included
Source: Japan 24-Bit Remaster

My Boyfriend's Back is the second album issued by American girl group The Angels in 1963. It was heavily weighted upon the success of the title track "My Boyfriend's Back" which was a number one hit; composed by the team of Bob Feldman, Jerry Goldstein, and Richard Gottehrer. Peggy Santiglia was by this time, the lead singer of The Angels but included on the album is the group's first hit "Till" which was originally recorded in 1961 with the group's previous lead singer, Linda Jansen. It is unspecified if the track was re-recorded with Santiglia on lead or not. There is also cover version of The Chiffons' "He's So Fine" as The Chiffons had covered "My Boyfriend's Back" and a reading of "Someday My Prince Will Come" from the 1937 film Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. The album sold fairly well and charted at No. 33 US, the group's most successful effort.

The Angels are an American girl group, best known for their 1963 No. 1 hit single, "My Boyfriend's Back".

The group originated in New Jersey as The Starlets which consisted of sisters, Barbara "Bibs" and Phyllis "Jiggs" Allbut, Bernadette Carroll, and Linda Malzone. They had some minor local hits and wound up doing back-up work in the studio. When Linda Malzone left, Linda Jankowski (later Jansen) became the new lead singer. Their manager, Tom DeCillis, turned his focus to Bernadette Carroll and dropped the rest of the group. Carroll would find solo success in 1963 with her Laurie single "Party Girl." After a failed attempt at record deal with producer Gerry Granahan, the Allbut sisters turned their focus to education. Phyllis Allbut was in teacher's college at the time and Barbara Allbut was accepted into the Juilliard School for her abilities as a musical arranger. Soon Granahan, who had previously rejected the group, suddenly saw hit potential in the song they had performed for him in their audition, a version of "Till," and wanted them to record it in the studio. "Til" became their first single under their new name, The Angels, and also their first hit (#14 US) released by Granahan's Caprice label in 1961. The song was followed up with a less-successful single, "Cry Baby Cry." The Angels had one album on Caprice, titled ...And The Angels Sing in 1962.

Jansen left the group in late 1962 to go solo and was replaced by Peggy Santiglia, formerly of The Delicates (with Denise Ferri and Arleen Lanzotti). Santiglia had sung jingles for WINS Radio, appeared on Broadway, and had songwriting experience. In 1963, the trio signed to Mercury Records' subsidiary label Smash Records and began working with the Feldman-Goldstein-Gottehrer songwriting team, who wrote "My Boyfriend's Back". 

The Angels - France EP 1963
The Angels' performance (with Santiglia on lead) was originally intended as a demo for The Shirelles' consideration, but the music publishers chose instead to release it as it stood. The song was a major hit, reaching number one on the Billboard Hot 100, but no follow-up of comparable success was released. "My Boyfriend's Back" sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc. The follow-up was the lower-charting "I Adore Him" (#25 US). The B-side "Thank You And Goodnight" was also favorable and charted at #84 US. During their Smash career, The Angels maintained a steady string of moderately successful singles which included "Wow Wow Wee (He's The Boy For Me)" (#41 US). Their album My Boyfriend's Back made the top forty, charting at #33 but their next, A Halo to You, didn't chart at all. The group left Smash in 1964 and signed with Congress Records.

The group became The Halos, following a dispute over the ownership of the name "The Angels." Peggy Santiglia took a leave of absence from the group in 1965 and was replaced by Toni Mason. (Contrary to rumors, Mason says she was not a recording member of Angie & The Chicklettes). The group released several more singles, none of which charted. Mason left the group in 1967 and was replaced by Debra Swisher (previously of The Pixies Three), who had recently recorded and released her own version of "Thank You And Goodnight" on the ABC-Paramount Records subsidiary, Boom Records. This lineup resumed using the name "The Angels" and released a handful of singles on RCA Records. Former Starlet Bernadette Carroll was back in the group and became the new lead. They appeared on "The Dean Martin Show" before disbanding in 1968. Santiglia and Phyllis and Barbara Allbut regrouped in the early 1970s and released a new single on Polydor Records.

Phyllis Allbut and Santiglia still perform as The Angels, joined occasionally by Barbara Allbut.

01. "My Boyfriend's Back"
02. "Someday My Prince Will Come"
03. "Has Anybody Seen My Boyfriend"
04. "Till"
05. "The Night Has a Thousand Eyes"
06. "Why Don't the Boy Leave Me Alone"
07. "He's So Fine"
08. "Thank You and Goodnight"
09. "The Hurdy-Gurdy Man"
11. "World Without Love"
12. "(Love Me) Now"
13. "The Guy with the Black Eye"

1. Link
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2. Link
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The Angels - German Single Jan 1964

Saturday, July 12

Billy Gray - Feeling Gray (Italian Progressive Rock 1972)



Size: 77.2 MB
Bitrate: 256
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Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included

The English guitarist of The Trip released a solo album and a single, both in a mainstream rock style with some blues influences. No much info about this album, Anyone who can help?

01. Harleytown 03.27
02. Leavin' A Big Town 03.04
03. Summer Nights 03.17
04. Falling Off The Edge 03.07
05. Midnight Swinger 03.28
06. Writing On The Wall 03.42
07. Borderline 03.42
08. Ann 02.39
09. Blue-Gray 05.49

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Tuesday, July 8

Foghat - WPLR Studios Dallas (FM Broadcast 1974)

Foghat Billboard Advertise Jule 15, 1972


Size: 151 MB
Bitrate: 320
mp3
Found on the Beach Yesterday
Some Artwork Included

Foghat are a British rock band that had their peak success in the 1970s, formed in London in 1971. Their style can be described as "blues-rock" or boogie-rock, dominated by electric and electric slide guitar. The band has achieved 8 gold records, one platinum and one double platinum record. The band had far more success in the United States than home in Britain.


The band initially featured Dave Peverett ("Lonesome Dave") on guitar and vocals, Tony Stevens on bass, and Roger Earl on drums when they left Savoy Brown in 1970. Rod Price on guitar/slide guitar joined after he left the Black Cat Bones in December 1970. The new line-up was named "Foghat" (a nonsense word from a childhood game played by Peverett and his brother) in January 1971. 

Their 1972 album, Foghat was produced by Dave Edmunds and had a cover of Willie Dixon's "I Just Want to Make Love to You", which received much airplay, especially on FM stations. The band's second self-titled album was also known as Rock and Roll for its cover photo of a rock and a bread roll, and it went gold. Energized came out in 1974, followed by Rock and Roll Outlaws and Fool for the City in 1975, the year that Stevens left the band after objecting to their endless touring schedule. Stevens was replaced temporarily by producer Nick Jameson in 1975 when the band recorded Fool for the City. 


Foghat - Fool For the City  1975 Billboard Magazine Advertise
In the next year, he was replaced by Craig MacGregor and the group produced Night Shift in 1976, a live album in 1977, and Stone Blue in 1978, each reaching "gold" record sales. Fool for the City spawned the hit single "Slow Ride" (which reached number 20 on the US charts), but the greatest sales figures were for Foghat Live, which sold over 2,000,000 copies. More hits followed: "Drivin' Wheel"; "I Just Want to Make Love to You" (from the live album); "Stone Blue"; and "Third Time Lucky (The First Time I Was a Fool)". 

But Rod Price, unhappy with the group's still constant touring and the shift away from their hard boogie sound towards a more New Wave influenced Pop direction, left the band in November 1980. After months of auditions he was replaced by Erik Cartwright by February 1981. [Wikipedia]


Pop-Spots - Foghat - Fool For The City 1975
(Outside of 232 East 11th Street between
second and Third Avenues,, New York.)
Foghat specialized in a simple, hard-rocking blues-rock, releasing a series of best-selling albums in the mid-'70s. While the group never deviated from their basic boogie, they retained a large audience until 1978, selling out concerts across America and earning several gold or platinum albums. Once punk and disco came along, the band's audience dipped dramatically.

Energized With its straight-ahead, three-chord romps, the band's sound was American in origin, yet the members were all natives of England. Guitarist/vocalist "Lonesome" Dave Peverett, bassist Tony Stevens, and drummer Roger Earl were members of the British blues band Savoy Brown, who all left the group in the early '70s. Upon their departure, they formed Foghat with guitarist Rod Price. Foghat moved to the United States, signing a record contract with Bearsville Records, a new label run by Albert Grossman. Their first album, Foghat, was released in the summer of 1972 and it became an album rock hit; a cover of Willie Dixon's "I Just Want to Make Love to You" even made it to the lower regions of the singles charts. For their next album, the group didn't change their formula at all -- in fact, they didn't even change the title of the album. 


Like the first record, the second was called Foghat; it was distinguished by a picture of a rock and a roll on the front cover. Foghat's second album was their first gold record, and it established them as a popular arena rock act. Their next six albums -- Energized (1974), Rock and Roll Outlaws (1974), Fool for the City (1975), Night Shift (1976), Foghat Live (1977), Stone Blue (1978) -- all were best-sellers and all went at least gold. "Slow Ride," taken from Fool for the City, was their biggest single, peaking at number 20. Foghat Live was their biggest album, selling over two million copies. After 1975, the band went through a series of bass players; Price left the band in 1981 and was replaced by Erik Cartwright.


In the early '80s, Foghat's commercial fortunes declined rapidly, with their last album, 1983's Zig-Zag Walk, barely making the album charts. The group broke up shortly afterward with Peverett retiring from the road. The remaining members of the band (Roger Earl, Erik Cartwright and Craig MacGregor) continued playing together as the Kneetremblers and after some line-up changes decided to revert to the Foghat name. 

The band toured throughout the decade and into the early 1990's. Perhaps growing tired of early retirement, Lonesome Dave formed his own version of Foghat in 1990 and hit the road. After healing their rift, the original Foghat (Peverett,Price, Stevens and Earl) reformed in 1993 and toured for years, releasing Return of the Boogie Men in 1994 and Road Cases in 1998. The original band broke apart for good with Peverett's passing due to cancer on February 7, 2000. 

After some time spent mourning, the band soldiered on with a new line-up (adding Charlie Huhn on vocals) and after two years of touring released Family Joules in 2002. Foghat toured for the next few years and regularly issued documents of their live act: The Official Bootleg DVD, Volume 1 in 2004 and Foghat Live II in 2007. In 2010, now on their own label, Foghat got back to their Blues roots with Last Train Home: a handful of original tunes amongst covers of many of their favorite blues songs and a couple tracks recorded with their friend Eddie Kirkland. As of 2013, they're still performing and recording. [AMG]

Discography: (The most important albums)
Foghat - S/T (US 1971) is the debut album by the band Foghat. The first of their two self-titled albums, it was released in 1972 on Bearsville Records.
 Foghat - Rock and Roll (US 1973) is the second album, as well as the second self-titled album by the band Foghat. It was released in March 1973, and is generally known by fans as Rock and Roll, because of its cover picture depicting a rock and bread roll.
 Foghat - Energized (US 1974) is the third album by the group Foghat. It was released in January 1974 and certified as an RIAA Gold Record in the US.
 Foghat - Rock and Roll Outlaws (US 1974) is the fourth album by Foghat, released in October 1974.
 Foghat - Fool for the City (US 1975) was the fifth album released by English rock band Foghat, released in 1975. This was their first platinum album and features, along with the title track, their most famous song "Slow Ride".
 Foghat - Night Shift (US 1976) was the sixth album by Foghat, released in 1976.
 Foghat - Live (US 1977) (A MUST HAVE!!) is a live album by Foghat. The release is Foghat's best selling album with over two million copies sold, and certified double platinum in the US. In 2007, to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the album, Foghat released the Live II double album.


Foghat - WPLR Studios 
Dallas TX, January 1974 
FM Broadcast

01. Wild Cherry (04:53)
02. Home In My Hand (05:08)
03. Dreamer (08:19)
04. Hate To See You Go (05:33)
05. Rock'n'Roll Outlaws (05:27)
06. I Just Wanna Make Love To You (09:08)
07. Chateau Lafitte 59 Boogie (08:06)
08. Maybelline (03:41)

Bonus Tracks:
KBFH, New Haven CT, 1974 (FM)
09. Honey Hush (05:40)

Extra Bonus:
San Diego CA, November 12, 1972 (FM)
10. I Just Wanna Make Love To You (07:20)
11. Louisiana Blues (02:46)

1. Link
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2. Link
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