Sunday, 12 February 2017

Picture of the day...



Ike & Tina Turner - River Deep ~ Mountain High (Soul US 1966)


Size: 79.6 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Artwork Included
Source: Japan SHM-CD Remaster

River Deep Mountain High is a studio album by the American R&B duo Ike & Tina Turner. The album contains songs from several different sources, 5 songs produced by the legendary producer Phil Spector and 7 songs that are older recordings produced by Ike Turner. It was released in September 1966 (1966-09) on A&M Records.

"River Deep – Mountain High" is a 1966 single by Ike & Tina Turner. Considered by producer Phil Spector to be his best work, the single was successful in Europe, peaking at #3 in the United Kingdom, though it flopped on its original release in the United States. Spector claimed to be pleased with the response from the critics and his peers, but he then withdrew from the music industry for two years, beginning his personal decline.

After Eric Burdon and the Animals covered the song in 1968, it was re-released a year later, and has since become one of Tina Turner's signature songs, though it charted even lower, "Bubbling Under" at #112.

In 1999, "River Deep – Mountain High" was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame.


Written by Spector, Jeff Barry, and Ellie Greenwich, "River Deep - Mountain High" was among the first recordings that Ike & Tina Turner did for Phil Spector's Philles Records. Spector was well aware of Ike Turner's controlling attitude in the studio, and resultantly drew up an unusual contract: the River Deep – Mountain High (album) and single would be credited to "Ike & Tina Turner", but Ike was paid $20,000 to stay away from the studio, and only Tina Turner's vocals would be used on record.

The track was recorded using Spector's "Wall of Sound" production technique, cost a then-unheard of $22,000, and required 21 session musicians and 21 background vocalists. Due to Spector's perfectionism in the studio, he made Turner sing the song over and over for several hours until he felt was the perfect vocal take for the song. 

The recording of the song was later dramatized for Tina Turner's biopic, What's Love Got to Do with It. At Ike Turner's 2007 funeral, Phil Spector chastised the film's depiction saying that he had a good relationship with Ike Turner and that the film was "garbage" stating that he insisted for Ike's name to be included on the recording despite the fact that executives of Spector's label Philles had only wanted Tina billed on the recording.

The single entered the lower end of the Billboard 100 and stopped at #88 on the pop charts. Even though it had better fortune in the United Kingdom, peaking at #3 in the singles charts on first release, Spector was so disillusioned that he ceased involvement in the recording industry totally for two years, and only intermittently returned to the studio after that; he effectively became a recluse and began to self-destruct.

Ike Turner remarked that he felt the record didn't do well in America because the sound was "pop or white", while Tina Turner's voice was R&B, so that "America mixes race in it"—though the writer Michael Billig observed that earlier records which had mixed black singers with a white pop sound had sold well, so it was likely to be that in 1966 the black political movement was encouraging African Americans to take a pride in their own culture, and "River Deep – Mountain High" was out of step with that movement.

Later Rolling Stone was to put it at #33 on its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

George Harrison praised the record, declaring it "a perfect record from start to finish." "River Deep - Mountain High" compared a woman's love and loyalty, respectively, to that which that a child feels for a doll, and a puppy has for his master.

In 1967, Harry Nilsson (who had worked with Spector as a songwriter early in his career) released a cover version of the song on his first RCA Victor album, Pandemonium Shadow Show. This was followed by an epic ten-minute version recorded by Deep Purple for their 1968 album, The Book of Taliesyn. An edited version was released as a single in the United States and reached #53 in early 1969 and #42 on the Canadian RPM charts.

The original Ike and Tina Turner version of the song was re-released the same year to a more receptive public and since then has gained the recognition Spector wanted from the record. Numerous versions have been recorded since, including two different recordings by Ike and Tina Turner that do not feature Spector's "Wall of Sound" production style, as well as some by Tina Turner herself without Ike Turner.

Eric Burdon & The Animals recorded an extended version of the song, with additional musical sections and a heavily dramatized arrangement, for their 1968 album Love Is. An edited version was released as a single, and the full version also appears on their 1969 compilation The Greatest Hits of Eric Burdon and The Animals. In 1985, Burdon recorded a live version of it and released it in 1992 on "That's Live".

The Australian band, The Easybeats, did a cover version in 1967. Another cover version was by 2 of Clubs, a Cincinnati-based American female pop duo, which failed to chart.

01."River Deep, Mountain High" (Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich, Phil Spector) - 3:38
02."I Idolize You" - 3:46
03."A Love Like Yours (Don't Come Knocking Everyday)" (Holland-Dozier-Holland) - 3:05
04."A Fool in Love" - 3:13
05."Make 'Em Wait" - 2:22
06."Hold on Baby" (Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich, Phil Spector) - 2:59
07."I'll Never Need More Than This" (Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich, Phil Spector) - 3:33
08."Save the Last Dance for Me" (Doc Pomus, Mort Shuman) - 3:02
09."Oh Baby!" (Kent Harris) - 2:46
10."Every Day I Have to Cry" (Arthur Alexander) - 2:40
11."Such a Fool for You" - 2:48
12."It's Gonna Work Out Fine" (J. Michael Lee, Joe Seneca) - 3:14

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Saturday, 11 February 2017

The Ikettes - Soul The Hits (Great Soul US 1964)


Size: 144 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included
Source: Japan 24-Bit Remaster

A great record from the Ikettes! It only takes one listen to this album to realize how much better this trio was than most of the other "girl" groups around at the time -- working with a depth and tightness that's way more than simple girl pop -- and which shows their close ties to the Ike Turner empire! The voices of all three singers are wonderful, and many of the tunes have the same sort of energy as the best grooves of the time from Ike & Tina -- upbeat and snapping, and almost with a trace of Northern Soul at times -- but a grittier undercurrent at others. Tracks include the super "Peaches 'N Cream", "Sally Go Round The Roses", "I'm So Thankful", "Lonely For You", and "Not That I Recall". 


This Japanese CD expands the original album tremendously -- from 12 tracks to 29 with the addition of lots more singles and material issued by some group members as solo artists. Bonus tracks include "How Come", "Your Love Is Mine", "Sha La La", "You're Trying To Make Me Lose My Mind", and "Fine Fine Fine" by The Ikettes -- plus "I'm Leaving You", "You're Still My Baby", "Give Me A Chance", and "Through With You" by Venetta Fields; "Blue With A Broken Heart" by Flora Williams; and "Easy Living" by Dee Dee Johnson.

01.I'M SO THANKFUL [3:10]
02.DA DOO RON RON [2:27]
03.CAMEL WALK [2:39]
04.CAN'T SIT DOWN 'COS I FEEL SO GOOD [2:21]
05.(NEVER MORE) LONELY FOR YOU [2:21]
06.NOT THAT I RECALL [2:05]
07.PEACHES 'N' CREAM [2:31]
08.SALLY GO ROUND THE ROSES [2:38]
09.DON'T FEEL SORRY FOR ME [3:01]
10.FINE,FINE,FINE [2:36]
11.NOBODY LOVES ME [2:45]
12.IT'S BEEN SO LONG [3:12]

13.CAMEL WALK [2:39] (Bonus)
14.THE BIGGEST PLAYERS [1:41] (Bonus)
15.HOW COME [1:57] (Bonus)
16.BLUE WITH A BROKEN HEART (aka BLUE ON BLUE) [2:57) (Bonus)
17.YOU'RE STILL MY BABY [3:36] (Bonus)
18.I'M LEAVING YOU [3:00] (Bonus)
19.THROUGH WITH YOU [3:26] (Bonus)
20.GIVE ME A CHANCE (TRY ME) [2:29] (Bonus)
21.CHEATER [2:22] (Bonus)
22.YOU'RE TRYING TO MAKE ME LOST MY MIND [2:12] (Bonus)
23.YOUR LOVE IS MINE [2:21] (Bonus)
24.YOU CAN'T HAVE YOUR CAKE AND EAT IT TOO [2:53] (Bonus)
25.THE LOCO-MOTION [2:20] (Bonus)
26.SHA LA LA [2:54] (Bonus)
27.CAMEL WALK [2:33] (Bonus)
28.(NEVER MORE) LONELY FOR YOU [2:20] (Bonus)
29.EASY LIVING (aka LIVING FOR YOU) [2:11] (Bonus)

1. The Ikettes
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2. The Ikettes
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3. The Ikettes

Ike & Tina - The Soul of Ike & Tina (Great Soul US 1966)


Size: 127 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included
Source: Japan 24-Bit Remaster

Ike & Tina Turner were an American rock & roll and soul duo, made of the husband-and-wife team of Ike Turner and Tina Turner in the 1960s and 1970s. Spanning sixteen years together as a recording group, the duo played among its repertoire, rock & roll, soul, blues and funk. They are known for their wild and entertaining dance shows and especially for their scintillating cover of "Proud Mary", for which they won a Grammy Award. The duo were inducted to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1991.

Ike Turner's first taste of musical stardom occurred in 1951 when his band, The Kings of Rhythm, recorded the blues single, "Rocket 88", later debated as the first rock and roll record ever issued. However, due to music industry regulations, the song was credited to Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats. Brenston later left for his own solo career, while Ike and his band concentrated on performing at local haunts in St. Louis.

In 1956, a sixteen-year-old named Anna Mae Bullock had moved from her hometown of Nutbush, Tennessee to live with her mother and sister in St. Louis. Within a year, Anna Mae frequented nightclubs with her sister. It was at one of these nightclubs that she first spotted Turner performing with the Kings of Rhythm. After seeing members of the audience getting chances to sing, she determinedly tried to secure her spot, finally succeeding by grabbing the microphone from a begrudging rival and launching into a version of B.B. King's "I Know You Love Me Baby". Her now-trademark raspy-throated vocals impressed Ike so much (he was known to have said to her, "Girl, I didn't know you can sing!" afterwards) that he allowed the girl known by friends as "Little Ann" in his band as a background singer. However, that changed after a male singer failed to show up for a recording session and Anna Mae, then eight months pregnant with her second child (her only child with Ike), recorded what became "A Fool in Love".


Originally Ike's intent was to erase her but after hearing her vocals he not only relented but also changed her stage name to Tina and appended his own surname to both, even though Ike was then still married to another woman. He also changed his group's name from The Kings of Rhythm to The Ike & Tina Turner Revue. The original group was extended to include three new background singers later known as "The Ikettes". Throughout their recording career, the ensemble was known simply as Ike and Tina Turner with Tina fronting the band through Ike's leadership.

Released in the winter of 1960, Ike & Tina's first single, "A Fool in Love", became an instant hit reaching number two on the Billboard Hot R&B Sides chart and number twenty-seven on the American pop singles chart, firmly launching the duo into the national spotlight with Tina being the major attraction to their live shows. That was followed a year later by "It's Gonna Work Out Fine" (written by Rose Marie McCoy), which included Mickey from one-hit wonders duo Mickey & Sylvia as "Ikey" in the background. That song gave them their first Grammy nomination and peaked at number fourteen on the pop singles chart. A third hit, 1962's "Poor Fool", was a sequel to "A Fool in Love", which peaked at number thirty-eight.

However, their chart success was limited compared to their live shows that included a series of grueling one-nighters and the occasional big shows. Ike & Tina's touring popularity helped them land national teen shows including Shindig!, Hollywood A Go-Go and American Bandstand. With Ike leading the band and Tina and the Ikettes dancing up a storm with Tina showcasing a shouting soulful voice, the Ike & Tina Turner Revue were a national attraction by the mid-1960s even with limited top forty pop success.

In 1966, Phil Spector signed Ike & Tina to his Phillies label and recorded the landmark single, "River Deep - Mountain High", with Ike accepting $25,000 from Spector not to participate in the recording and to be allowed to record Tina alone. While the record failed to grant success on the American pop charts peaking at a dismal eighty-eight (commonly blamed on the over-hyping of the single by radio djs before its release), the song later became an international hit reaching number three on the UK pop chart. the Revue opened for the Stones on their 1966 and 1969 US tours gaining international acclaim.

By 1969, that acclaim was finally getting them more chart action with the release of the blues-heavy "Outta Season" and The Hunter. From the album "The Hunter" Tina received another Grammy Nomination for Best R&B Female Vocal Performance for the song "Bold Soul Sister". That same year, the group opened for the Stones on their Altamont festival (one song from their performance appears in the 1970 documentary of the concert, Gimme Shelter). That year, they scored a hit with their version of Sly & the Family Stone's "I Want To Take You Higher." Also in 1970, they appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show and performed an early version of what would be their biggest hit to date - a cover of the Creedence Clearwater Revival song, "Proud Mary" and "Bold Soul Sister".

Released in the spring of 1971, "Proud Mary" gave the duo their biggest chart success, reaching number four on the American pop singles chart and winning the Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group in 1972. In 1971, they performed in Africa for a documentary film titled Soul II Soul; and were more briefly seen performing in the Milos Forman film Taking Off. The duo scored their final Top 30 chart hit with the Tina-penned semi-autobiographical "Nutbush City Limits" in 1973.

01. Goodbye So Long   2:10 
02. If I Can't Be First   2:11 
03. Chicken Shack   1:56 
04. I Don't Need   2:16 
05. I Wish My Dreams Would Come True   1:45 
06. Hard Times   2:18 
07. Flee Flee Flee   2:27 
08. It's Crazy Baby   2:58 
09. Gonna Have Fun   2:07 
10. Am I a Fool in Love   2:57 
11. Something Came Over Me   2:44 
12. Hurt Is All You Gave Me   2:30 
13. Don't You Blame It on Me   1:47 

Bonus Tracks
14. All I Could Do Was Cry (aka Stop The Wedding)
15. You Can't Miss Nothing
16. My Baby Now
17. Flee Flee Fla
18. Makin' Plans Together
19. Give Me Your Love
20. I Can't Believe What You Say
21. I Need A Man
22. Baby, Don't Do It
23. Over You
24. He's The One
25. Shake It Baby
26. Five Long Years
27. What Do You Think I Am
28. You Can't Have Your Cake And Eat It Too 

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Ike & Tina Turner - Revue Live (Rare Soul Album US 1964)


Size: 72.2 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: chrisGoesRock
Artwork Included
Source: Japan 24-Bit Remaster

Ike & Tina Turner were an American rock & roll and soul duo, made of the husband-and-wife team of Ike Turner and Tina Turner in the 1960s and 1970s. Spanning sixteen years together as a recording group, the duo played among its repertoire, rock & roll, soul, blues and funk. They are known for their wild and entertaining dance shows and especially for their scintillating cover of "Proud Mary", for which they won a Grammy Award. The duo were inducted to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1991.


Origins
Ike Turner's first taste of musical stardom occurred in 1951 when his band, The Kings of Rhythm, recorded the blues single, "Rocket 88", later debated as the first rock and roll record ever issued. However, due to music industry regulations, the song was credited to Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats. Brenston later left for his own solo career, while Ike and his band concentrated on performing at local haunts in St. Louis.

In 1956, a sixteen-year-old named Anna Mae Bullock had moved from her hometown of Nutbush, Tennessee to live with her mother and sister in St. Louis. Within a year, Anna Mae frequented nightclubs with her sister. It was at one of these nightclubs that she first spotted Turner performing with the Kings of Rhythm. After seeing members of the audience getting chances to sing, she determinedly tried to secure her spot, finally succeeding by grabbing the microphone from a begrudging rival and launching into a version of B.B. King's "I Know You Love Me Baby". Her now-trademark raspy-throated vocals impressed Ike so much (he was known to have said to her, "Girl, I didn't know you can sing!" afterwards) that he allowed the girl known by friends as "Little Ann" in his band as a background singer. However, that changed after a male singer failed to show up for a recording session and Anna Mae, then eight months pregnant with her second child (her only child with Ike), recorded what became "A Fool in Love".

Originally Ike's intent was to erase her but after hearing her vocals he not only relented but also changed her stage name to Tina and appended his own surname to both, even though Ike was then still married to another woman. He also changed his group's name from The Kings of Rhythm to The Ike & Tina Turner Revue. The original group was extended to include three new background singers later known as "The Ikettes". Throughout their recording career, the ensemble was known simply as Ike and Tina Turner with Tina fronting the band through Ike's leadership.

Success
Released in the winter of 1960, Ike & Tina's first single, "A Fool in Love", became an instant hit reaching number two on the Billboard Hot R&B Sides chart and number twenty-seven on the American pop singles chart, firmly launching the duo into the national spotlight with Tina being the major attraction to their live shows. That was followed a year later by "It's Gonna Work Out Fine" (written by Rose Marie McCoy), which included Mickey from one-hit wonders duo Mickey & Sylvia as "Ikey" in the background. That song gave them their first Grammy nomination and peaked at number fourteen on the pop singles chart. A third hit, 1962's "Poor Fool", was a sequel to "A Fool in Love", which peaked at number thirty-eight.

However, their chart success was limited compared to their live shows that included a series of grueling one-nighters and the occasional big shows. Ike & Tina's touring popularity helped them land national teen shows including Shindig!, Hollywood A Go-Go and American Bandstand. With Ike leading the band and Tina and the Ikettes dancing up a storm with Tina showcasing a shouting soulful voice, the Ike & Tina Turner Revue were a national attraction by the mid-1960s even with limited top forty pop success.

In 1966, Phil Spector signed Ike & Tina to his Phillies label and recorded the landmark single, "River Deep - Mountain High", with Ike accepting $25,000 from Spector not to participate in the recording and to be allowed to record Tina alone. While the record failed to grant success on the American pop charts peaking at a dismal eighty-eight (commonly blamed on the over-hyping of the single by radio djs before its release), the song later became an international hit reaching number three on the UK pop chart. the Revue opened for the Stones on their 1966 and 1969 US tours gaining international acclaim.

By 1969, that acclaim was finally getting them more chart action with the release of the blues-heavy "Outta Season" and The Hunter. From the album "The Hunter" Tina received another Grammy Nomination for Best R&B Female Vocal Performance for the song "Bold Soul Sister". That same year, the group opened for the Stones on their Altamont festival (one song from their performance appears in the 1970 documentary of the concert, Gimme Shelter). That year, they scored a hit with their version of Sly & the Family Stone's "I Want To Take You Higher." Also in 1970, they appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show and performed an early version of what would be their biggest hit to date - a cover of the Creedence Clearwater Revival song, "Proud Mary" and "Bold Soul Sister".


Released in the spring of 1971, "Proud Mary" gave the duo their biggest chart success, reaching number four on the American pop singles chart and winning the Grammy Award for Best R&B Vocal Performance by a Duo or Group in 1972. In 1971, they performed in Africa for a documentary film titled Soul II Soul; and were more briefly seen performing in the Milos Forman film Taking Off. The duo scored their final Top 30 chart hit with the Tina-penned semi-autobiographical "Nutbush City Limits" in 1973.

Decline
By 1975, the Ike & Tina Turner Revue's popularity was fading. Seventeen years after she was first allowed in Ike's band, Tina began to take more steps toward a solo career, appearing without Ike on shows such as The Cher Show and The Mike Douglas Show. That same year, she gave a rousing performance in the rock musical Tommy as the Acid Queen.

Fearful of Tina's growing independence after years of what she described as imprisoned torture at his hands, Ike—high on cocaine and prescription pills—abused Tina in order to keep her within his control. Years later, Tina recalled in her I, Tina autobiography that Ike had used abuse to control her throughout the group's tenure and the pair's 16-year marriage.

Tina finally escaped from Ike after another violent confrontation while en route to a hotel in Dallas before a show. Tina said she ran out of the hotel's back door and kept running until she saw a Ramada Inn Hotel where, with only 36 cents in her purse, she left Ike for good and the Ike & Tina Turner Revue abruptly came to an end. Tina then filed for divorce and the former duo fought over legal matters in divorce court until the matter was resolved in 1978 with Ike retaining all monetary assets. During this time, Tina was sued by concert promoters for concerts missed with Ike.

Solo careers
Tina was allowed to keep the stage name Ike had given her and within six years climbed her way back to the top, finding success while performing in Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and most famously at New York City's Ritz Theater and later opening for rock acts David Bowie, The Rolling Stones, and Rod Stewart, the latter of which brought Tina with him to perform their rendition of "Hot Legs" on Saturday Night Live. Tina eventually found solo superstardom following the release of 1984's Private Dancer album which sold 11 million copies, and included the biggest hit of her recording career, "What's Love Got to Do With It", which peaked at number one on the US pop chart, a position Ike & Tina never reached while together.

Ike, in the meantime, failed to gain any solo success during the first years without Tina and was besmirched by legal troubles including a conviction on drug charges. After his release from prison in 1993, Ike found musical acclaim on his own as a blues musician, eventually winning his first solo Grammy in 2007 with the album Risin' With the Blues.

Tina, in the meantime, had become an international rock superstar with successful albums and selling out stadiums throughout the 1980s and 1990s winning eight Grammys in the process. Having established herself as a pop superstar, Tina semi-retired from performing after a successful stadium tour in 2000. In 2005, she released her highly successful album All The Best which debuted at #2 on the Billboard 200. The album went multi platinum in many countries including the U.S. and the UK. In 2008, Tina delivered a heart stopping performance at the Grammy Awards alongside Beyonce Knowles. In October 2008, Tina returned to performing with her "Tina Live" world tour.


Controversy
Though regarded as one of the most explosive rock music duos in history, Ike & Tina's musical success has been overshadowed by stories of domestic abuse committed by Ike against Tina and Ike's legal battles, which have subsided since his 1993 release from prison. Ike's reputation was further damaged after the release of the 1993 Tina Turner biopic, What's Love Got to Do with It, which documented the Turners' turbulent marriage and depicted Ike — played by Laurence Fishburne in the film — as a jealous and violent wife batterer. After the film and Tina's I, Tina autobiography (the film's basis), Ike steadfastly denied the abuse allegations saying that he only hit Tina a few times and that Tina often hit back. In his own autobiography, 1999's Takin' Back My Name, he admitted that he "slapped Tina...there have been times I have punched her for no reason" but hadn't done anything he wouldn't mind anyone doing to his "own mother". He denied ever beating her as alleged in Tina's book.

During an appearance in St. Louis, controversy arose around Ike again when he was denied having a day in his honor due to his history of abuse against Tina. Ike publicly apologized to his former wife for "all the things that I've done that hurt her" but admitted he couldn't change the past.

Ike Turner died from an apparent cocaine overdose on December 12, 2007 at his home in San Diego. He was 76 years old.

Tina is living with her partner of twenty-three years, German-born Erwin Bach, in Switzerland and France.

01. Please, Please, Please - Ike & Tina Turner
02. Feelin' Good - Jimmy Thomas
03. The Love Of My Man - Venetta Fields
04. Think - Bobby John
05. Drown In My Own Tears - Stacy Johnson
06. I Love The Way You Love - Robbie Montgomery
07. For Your Precious Love - Vernon Guy
08. All In My Mind - Ike & Tina Turner
09. I Can't Believe What You Say - Ike & Tina Turner

1. Revue Live
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2. Revue Live
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3. Revue Live

Thursday, 2 February 2017

Various Artist - The Warner-Reprise Albums 1969-70


Size: 665 MB
Bitrate: 320
mp3
Found in my Blogroll, Thanks!
Artwork Included

























Disc 1
01. Neil Young (with Crazy Horse) - Cinnamon Girl (2:59)
02. The Grateful - Dead Doin’ That Rag (abridged) (2:22)
03. Geoff & Maria Muldaur - All Bowed Down (2:47)
04. The Everly Brothers - Empty Boxes (mono) (2:46)
05. Doug Kershaw - Son Of A Louisiana Man (2:16)
06. David Blue - Atlanta Farewell (abridged) (1:48)
07. Arlo Guthrie - Every Hand In The Land (2:21)
08. The Blue Velvet Band - Weary Blues From Waitin’ (3:07)
09. Theo Bikel - Piggies (3:13)
10. Joni Mitchell - “My American Skirt” (0:35)
11. Joni Mitchell - The Fiddle And The Drum (2:47)
12. John Renbourn - Transfusion (1:58)
13. Bert Jansch - Poison (3:11)
14. The Pentangle - Once I Had A Sweetheart (4:41)
15. Joni Mitchell - “Spoony’s Wonderful Adventure” (0:38)
16. Peter, Paul & Mary - Going To The Zoo (3:16)

Disc 2
01. Sweetwater - Day Song (1:46)
02. Louie Shelton - A Walk In The Country (1:59)
03. Lorraine Ellison - Stay With Me (3:35)
04. Van Dyke Parks - Music For Ice Capades TV Commercials (1:49)
05. Randy Newman - Yellow Man (2:15)
06. Pearls Before Swine - These Things Too (3:24)
07. Hamilton Camp Star - Spangled Bus (2:44)
08. Ella Fitzgerald - The Hunter Gets Captured By The Game (3:01)
09  The Fugs Yodelin’ Yippie (2:17)
10. The Mothers Of Invention - Electric Aunt Jemima (1:41)
11. Jethro Tull - Fat Man (2:45)
12. Mephistopheles Take A Jet (2:33)
13. The Jimi Hendrix - Experience Stone Free (3:37)
14. The Kinks - Nothing To Say (mono) (3:15)
15. Fats Domino - Everybody’s Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Monkey (2:44)

Disc 1
01. Wild Man Fischer - Songs For Sale (0:32)
02. Jethro Tull - My Sunday Feeling (3:36)
03. The Pentangle - Sweet Child (5:09)
04. Van Morrison - Slim Slow Slider (3:18)
05. Family - Second Generation Woman (3:13)
06. Neil Young - I’ve Been Waiting For You (2:30)
07. Tom Northcott - Sunny Goodge Street (2:59)
08. Wild Man Fischer - Songs For Sale (0:19)
09. The Everly Brothers - T For Texas (3:46)
10. The Everly Brothers - Lord Of The Manor (4:45)
11. Van Dyke Parks - The All Golden (3:45)
12. Van Dyke Parks - Music For A Datsun Television Commercial (1:02)
13. Sal Valentino - Alligator Man (2:36)
14. The Beau Brummels - Deep Water (2:30)
15. Randy Newman - Davy The Fat Boy (2:47)

Disc 2
01. Tiny Tim - Mr. Tim Laughs (0:25)
02. The Mothers Of Invention - The Voice Of Cheese (3:47
03. The Mothers Of Invention - The Air (2:50)
04. The Fugs - The Divine Toe (Part I) (3:06)
05. The Fugs - Wide, Wide River (2:48)
06. Arlo Guthrie - The Pause Of Mr. Claus (7:56)
07. Sweetwater - Why Oh Why (3:01)
08. Joni Mitchell - Nathan La Franeer (3:15)
09. Eric Andersen - So Good To Be With You (3:08)
10. The Electric Prunes - Finders Keepers (3:01)
11. The Kinks - Picture Book (2:35)
12. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Red House (3:49)
13. Miriam Makeba - I Shall Be Released (2:54)

Disc 1
01. The Fifth Avenue Band - Nice Folks (2:27)
02. John Sebastian - Red-Eye Express (2:57)
03. The Beach Boys - This Whole World (1:56)
04. Geoff & Maria Muldaur - New Orleans Hopscop Blues (2:45)
05. Arlo Guthrie - Coming In To Los Angeles (3:04)
06. Eric Andersen I Was The Rebel, She Was The Cause (2:36)
07. Norman Greenbaum - Jubilee (2:58)
08. Savage Grace - Ivy (4:09)
09. Van Morrison - Caravan (4:58)
10. Fleetwood Mac - Oh Well – Parts 1 & 2 (9:02)
11. The Pentangle - Sally Go Round The Roses (3:36)
12. Jethro Tull - Nothing Is Easy (4:24)
13. Small Faces - Flying (4:17)
14. Family - No Mule’s Fool (3:18)
15. The Kinks - When I Turn Out The Living Room Light (mono) (2:24)

Disc 2
01. The Everly Brothers - I’m On My Way Home Again (2:21)
02. Tim Buckley - Happy Time (3:12)
03. Joni Mitchell - Big Yellow Taxi (2:17)
04. Neil Young - The Loner (3:51)
05. Gordon Lightfoot - Approaching Lavender (2:53)
06. Randy Newman - Mama Told Me Not To Come (2:11)
07. James Taylor - Fire And Rain (3:24)
08. Dion-  Sit Down Old Friend (3:26)
09. Ed Sanders - The Illiad (4:07)
10. GTO’s - Kansas And The GTO’s (1:30)
11. GTO’s The Captain’s Fat Theresa Shoes (1:56)
12. Captain Beefheart And His Magic Band - Ella Guru (2:27)
13. GTO’s - The Original GTO’s (1:06)
14. The Mothers Of Invention - WPLJ (2:53)
15. Wild Man Fischer - The Taster & The Story Of The Taster (2:57)
16. Pearls Before Swine - Footnote (1:18)
17. The Grateful Dead - Turn On Your Love Light (abridged) (6:45)

Part 1: Warner
Part 2: Warner
Part 3: Warner
Part 4: Warner
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Part 1: Warner
Part 2: Warner
Part 3: Warner
Part 4: Warner
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Part 1: Warner
Part 2: Warner
Part 3: Warner
Part 4: Warner

All files comes from: Willard's Wormholes website at http://www.willardswormholes.com/ If you want more of these Warner Albums, take a look in there.  //ChrisGoesRock

Thursday, 26 January 2017

Request: Gravedigger V - The Mirror Cracked (Superb Garagerock US 1984)


Size: 141 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included

Classic caveman garage rawk from San Diego. This CD combines their Voxx debut album with the live tracks, outtakes and demos from their later LP's "The Mirror Cracked", also on Voxx.

The Gravedigger Five was a garage rock revival band formed in 1984 in San Diego, California. The band was part of the Paisley Underground, a musical movement centered around Los Angeles, California, which referenced 1960s West Coast pop and garage rock. The band's lineup consisted of Leighton Koizumi on vocals and sound effects, Ted Friedman on lead guitar, John Hanrattie on rhythm guitar and backup vocals, Dave "The Animal" Anderson on drums and percussion, and originally Chris Gast, who was replaced on bass and backing vocals by Tom Ward. When the Gravedigger Five broke up, members of the band went on to form The Morlocks and Manual Scan.

The members of the Gravedigger Five began playing together around 1983, practicing under the name "The Shamen" in bassist Chris Gast's garage. The group began writing songs together while its members were still teenagers; lead singer Leighton Koizumi was only sixteen years old when the band began to perform. When the band eventually went on to play the Whiskey A Go Go, the band members had to wait outside between sets, as the members were too young to be in the club. The name "The Shamen" was abandoned after the group discovered that the name was already in use by another band, and so after a night of brainstorming, purportedly at a local Bob's Big Boy, the group renamed their band the Gravedigger Five, a take-off on the old "Monster Mash" backing group The Cryptkicker V. 

All Black and Hairy
After only a few performances the group caught the interest of Voxx Records owner Greg Shaw, who signed the band to his imprint in January, 1984. The band recorded their first LP the same year, sleeping together in a car in an alley adjacent to the studio while not recording. Their first LP, "All Black and Hairy," was released towards the end of 1984, but even before its release original bassist Chris Gast was ejected from the band as a result of his substance abuse problems. Shortly after Gast's dismissal the rest of the band fell apart and the group disbanded. The band released its entire catalogue posthumously. Following the breakup of the band, Voxx released the band's first LP, "All Black and Hairy," in 1984. 


The Mirror Cracked
In 1987, three years after the breakup of the band, Voxx Records released a second Gravedigger Five LP. Under the title "The Mirror Cracked," Voxx packaged a number of unreleased All Black and Hairy session tracks, backed with eight crudely-recorded live tracks recorded in 1984. The Gravedigger Five's second release contained a number of cover songs, including two Stoics songs, "Enough of What I Need" and "Be a Caveman." The LP also contained a version of "No Good Woman," with fellow Paisley Underground alum Paula Pierce of The Pandoras on backing vocals. Lead singer Koizumi took offense to the mediocre way the album was assembled. 

After the Gravedigger Five
After the Gravedigger Five disbanded, Koizumi and Friedman moved to the Bay Area where they founded The Morlocks, another Paisley Underground garage rock revival band which continued the Gravedigger Five sound. Dave Anderson and Tom Ward continued on together in the band Manual Scan, and afterwards Anderson went on to perform with The Trebles, The Answers, The Crawdaddies and Skid Roper. The band reunited for one final show in 1999, playing Cave Stomp at New York’s annual garage rockathon. This would be the last time a full reunion would be possible as bassist Chris Gast died in New York in 2000. 

01. All Black and Hairy  
02. Tomorrow Is Yesterday  
03. No Good Woman  
04. Do Like Me  
05. Hate  
06. She's a Cur  
07. Searching  
08. She's Gone  
09. Night of the Phantom  
10. Don't Tread on My  
11. One Ugly Child  
12. She Got  
13. Stoneage Stomp  
14. Mirror Cracked  
15. Enough of What I Need  
16. Be a Caveman  
17. No Good Woman - Gravedigger Five, Paula Pierce  
18. It's Spooky  
19. Drivin' Me Insane  
20. Stop It Baby  
21. Searchin' [Live]  
22. She's Gone [Live]  
23. Enough of What I Need [Live]  
24. Be a Caveman [Live]  
25. She's a Cur [Live]  
26. Mirror Cracked [Live]  
27. Night of the Phantom [Live]  
28. Tomorrow Is Yesterday [Live] 

+ Surprise Album (1984 Release)

Part 1. Gravedigger V
Part 2. Gravedigger V
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Part 1. Gravedigger V
Part 2. Gravedigger V
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Part 1. Gravedigger V
Part 2. Gravedigger V

Little Sonny - New King of Blues Harmonica (Rare STAX Album US 1969)


Size: 68.2MB
Bit Rate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included
Source: Japan 24-Bit Remaster

New King of Blues Harmonica, the first album recorded by Little Sonny, finds the harpist living up to his name, turning out a hard-driving collection of Chicago blues. At times, he's a little too hung up on sounding like Sonny Boy Williamson, but for the most part, this is thoroughly enjoyable, high-octane Chicago blues. However, the presence of an organ on most of the record may be a little distracting for purists.


Little Sonny (aka Aaron Willis) grew up in Alabama, but came into his own as part of the fertile Detroit blues scene before finding a home with the famous Stax soul music label. On this album, he deftly mixes deep blues with soulful R&B with excellent results. It’s a pretty heavy burden to be called the "new king" of anything, let alone something as rich as the blues harmonica legacy, but he is up to the task. 


Little Sonny sings on a few tracks, and he has a fine voice, opening with the classic Jimmy Reed shuffle “Baby, What You Want Me to Do,” the band takes things at a nice easy gallop. “Don't Ask Me No Questions” has a Little Walter-ish feel, with Sonny making the strutting lyric his own. “Goin’ Down Slow” revisits some classic blues territory to good effect, with Sonny taking his time and delivering the vocal and harp with class and dignity. 

The Hohner 1896 Marine Band 10-hole diatonic harmonica
The remainder of the album consists of instrumentals featuring Little Sonny’s harmonica playing. While he never did quite ascend to the the level of king, he was quite a player as these performances demonstrate. Songs like “Eli’s Pork Chop” mix the down home blues with some soulful touches to good effect, with the organist in the band and occasional horn accompaniment move things along nicely. 

Blues fell on hard times for a while in the 1970‘s, with clubs closing and some of the legendary musicians falling ill and passing on. But Little Sonny was an example of the torch of the blues being passed on to a younger man, and on this album he held that torch high.

People who’ve heard Little Sonny’s albums, New King of the Blues Harmonica and Black and Blue on Enterprise Records (a division of the Stax Organization), are surprised to see him in person. From the funky music he plays, listeners expect an old, raggedy, hard-drinking stereotype of the typical down-and-out bluesman.

Harmonica-friendly Amplifiers Fender 59 Bassman Combo
"I suppose some of the things I’ve been through should have driven me to drink," admits the youthful, clean-cut Sonny, who doesn’t drink, smoke, or mess with dope. "I’ve seen too many bad examples of too much alcohol. Also, my mother was very religious, and I promised her I’d never drink. If I’ve got an audience, that’s all the alcohol I need. I couldn’t go onstage and do a good job if I were high."

Little Sonny surprises many people, especially young blues fans, with his sober approach to the blues, but he’s just trying to be himself.

"The idea that a man has to use foul language, dress raggedy and bummy, and get into cuttin’ and shootin’ scrapes in order to sing the blues is just a sham. I feel what I sing and play because of the things I’ve been through. I’ve had my share of hard times, but that doesn’t give me an excuse to drink and swear and cut up."

When Sonny plays his harmonica or sings the blues, all the rugged experiences he’s survived come out in his music.

Born in a one-room country shack in Greensboro, Alabama on October 6, 1932, he spent many of his younger days hungry and barefoot. He’s never seen his father. And he was looked after by his mother who made their clothes without the benefit of a sewing machine.

"The other kids used to laugh at me, but I made up my mind that I was going to be somebody regardless of what people thought. When I started playing music, people told me to my face that I’d never make it," Sonny admits. "The blues is a living thing, and I have lived the blues. When I think of the unfair things that have happened to me because of the color of my skin, of all the times I’ve had to go in the back door, I know I’ve paid my dues."

Sonny, who was born Aaron Willis, listened to the blues on the radio when he was a boy. His mother considered the blues "the old people’s way, something dirty," but she bought her son five-cent harmonicas. Sonny tried to play them without much success.

Baseball was his main interest. He played on sandlot teams in Alabama for a few years before moving to Detroit seventeen years ago.

"I knew no baseball scout was going to see me as far back in the woods as I was. I didn’t really have aspirations of being a musician when I came to Detroit. But then, I saw Sonny Boy Williamson."

Sonny was "spellbound at the way he played. After the show I went home and practiced for hours. Every day after that I would practice until I got the sound I wanted."

Sonny Boy Williamson also inspired Aaron Willis to adopt the name Little Sonny. Working in a used car lot by day, Little Sonny would go from bar to bar at night making a little money taking pictures and hoping for a chance to sit in with the musicians onstage.

After sitting in with Washboard Willie at the Good Times Bar one evening, Sonny was offered ten dollars a night, three nights a week by the club owner. Within six months, Sonny formed his own group. During the years that followed, he worked five shows a night in many Detroit bars and clubs, packing the rooms every weekend. He spent two years at the Bank Bar, four and a half at the Congo Lounge, five years in the Apex Bar, and two years at the Calumet Show Bar. He still took Polaroid pictures of the customers between sets and often he earned more money from the photography than from entertaining. It was a rough grind, but he managed to make a living and eventually to buy a car and a home for his wife and four children.

Sonny has had some unpleasant experiences with small record companies over the years. He sent a homemade demo tape of "I Got to Find My Baby" to Duke Records in Texas. They sent him a contract and issued the rough tape. He never got near a recording studio. The musician’s union got him out of that one. All Sonny received for recording "Love Shock" with the JVB Recording Company was twenty-five dollars he borrowed from them. He started his own label Speedway and although he couldn’t get any airplay, he sold enough copies of "The Mix Up" in the clubs he worked to clear expenses.

Excello Records bought "Love Shock" from JVB and got Sonny’s name on a two-year contract. But they never recorded him, so he sat it out. "Orange Pineapple Cherry Blossom Pink" sold well for Wheelsville, USA Records, but Sonny was never paid. Then, Revilot Records expressed an interest and he cut "The Creeper." It sold fairly well, but Sonny didn’t like the way the sound was mixed. He was in control of the next few sessions which produced "Don’t Ask Me No Questions" and "Sonny’s Bag," his first Top Twenty hit in Detroit. From then on, things got better.

Late in 1969, Al Bell, executive vice president of the Stax Organization, offered Sonny his first opportunity to cut an album. New King of the Blues Harmonica,released on the Enterprise label, was recorded in five and a half hours. Sonny and his band knew all the songs so there were few retakes.

For his second album, Black and Blue, Sonny flew to the Stax studios in Memphis and recorded eleven sides in one weekend. It was the #1 blues album in Detroit and #3 on the local LP charts. Sonny has played several music festivals, he headlined two blues concerts at Wayne State University, he’s been written about in several books on the blues, and, in general, his reputation has been growing.

Sonny’s music has been called everything from blues to jazz, and some listeners detect spiritual and rock influences. He enjoys listening to and learning from all kinds of music.

"I’m working on my own ideas," says Sonny, "not something the other man has already done. A lot of other blues musicians say I’m playing rock music because it’s up-tempo, and it’s a different style. They’ve never heard it before and they refuse to say it’s blues.

"Other harmonica players will play their part of a song then pause, then play again. Well, I’m constantly playing. I breathe in and out of the harmonica, and I fill in where other musicians would have a space," says Sonny, who prefers an Old Standby 34B harmonica for its fast action and tone quality.

Little Sonny has been playing the blues for sixteen years. He’s had over a dozen singles and two albums. He’s received excellent reviews for his performances and recordings. But he knows that there’s still more territory to be covered before he can sit back and say he’s had that really big break.

"I’ll pay my dues until the day comes," he says. "My time will come, and I’m going to work for it."

That’s what the blues is all about.

01. Baby, What You Want Me To Do  03:54
02. Eli's Pork Chop  06:39
03. Hey Little Girl  02:38
04. Hot Potato  03:11
05. Don't Ask Me No Questions  03:58
06. Tomorrow's Blues Today  02:45
07. Back Down Yonder  02:43
08. Sad Funk  03:04
09. The Creeper Returns  04:12

1. Little Sonny 1969
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2. Little Sonny 1969
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3. Little Sonny 1969