Thursday, 4 February 2016

Hideki Ishima - One Day (Psychedelic Folkrock/Hardrock Japan 1973, ex Flower Travelling band)


Size: 67.5 MB
Bitrate:
mp3
Rippd by ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included
Source: Japan 24-Bit Remaster

Hideki Ishima (石間 秀機 Ishima Hideki?, born 21 March 1944 in Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan) is a Japanese musician, known primarily for his work with Flower Travellin' Band. A guitarist and sitar player for nearly forty years, he now exclusively plays the sitarla, an instrument he invented in 2000 that combines aspects of a sitar with an electric guitar.

Ishima started playing guitar at 19, at the behest of a friend who wanted to be in a band. His first group was Jarōzu (ジャローズ) in his native Sapporo shortly after graduating high school. He moved to Tokyo and formed the group sounds band The Beavers in 1966, who had released four albums and one single but had not had major success.

Ishima began playing sitar at 24, after researching Gábor Szabó at the suggestion of a woman and learning that the jazz guitarist also played this instrument he had never heard of. He taught himself from Ravi Shankar's 1968 book My Music, My Life, looking up the Japanese translations for the English words.

In 1969, while in the blues band Mystic Morning with Joe Yamanaka, the two of them were scouted by Yuya Uchida for Flower Travellin' Band. When they went on hiatus in 1973, Ishima recorded the solo album One Day and joined a group called Trans Am. After a few years off, he followed this with the Donjuan R&R Band with Kenichi Hagiwara. During the 1980s he was in Co-Colo alongside Kenji Sawada and Nobuhiko Shinohara, before being fired.

Ishima quit guitar in 1990, citing money problems. After a 40-minute sitar lesson from Manilal Nag during a trip to Japan in 1998, Ishima became a student of Nag's Japanese apprentice.

He made a comeback in 2000 exclusively playing the sitarla. That year, he recorded the album More-ish with the multinational group Pythagoras Party. The improvi sational instrumental group View was formed in 2007.

Any Japanese rock fan worth their salt knows The Flower Travellin' Band. As guitarist for that unit, Hideki Ishima helped create one of the most distinctive guitar albums in rock history, 1971's "Satori." His buzzing, limber lines gave the record its shape and made an impact that is still being felt today. Especially in the West, where "Satori" has justly been branded as not just a lost classic, but perhaps the lost classic, acting as the de facto entry point to anyone serious about educating themselves on Japanese rock music. Imagining Japanese rock without "Satori" is like imagining western rock without Jimi Hendrix's "Are You Experienced."

But when the Flower Travellin' Band went on hiatus in 1973 (they did not break up, as Ishima-san will be quick to point out,) the endlessly inventive guitarist dropped off western radar. 

During that period, he continued to make exceptional work with bands like Co-Colo, Trans Am, Pythagoras Party, and the Donjuan R&B Band, as well as backing up vocalists like Flower Travellin' Band's Joe Yamanaka, and occasional Akira Kurosawa actor Jinpachi Nezu ("Ran," "Kagemusha.")

Now, with the Flower Travellin' Band off hiatus, Ishima is back in the spotlight. 

He's also got a new improv unit called View, and exclusively plays the Sitarla, a sitar/guitar hybrid of his own invention. In February, Ishima-san sat down with Jrawk to discuss gifts from God, the state of Japanese rock, and resurrecting his old band.

01. We're Just Tryin' My Way 6:35
02. Artificial Flowers 3:46
03. Lady Bird 3:32
04. Night Mare 3:37
05. Unbalance 3:47
06. Depending by the Time 6:52
07. Trash Blues 3:06

1. Hideki Ishima
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2. Hideki Ishima
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3. Hideki Ishima
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Friday, 29 January 2016

Strange tool, i think it's for wood work, someone who knows?


Hi. Is it someone out there who know what this tool is for?, myself i guess the tool is for some wood work (?). Looking forward to hear from some of you soon...

//ChrisGoesRock

PS. Open picture in a NEW window for 100% size.




Saturday, 23 January 2016

Parrish & Gurvitz Band - Selftitled (Great and Classic Rock UK 1971)


Size: 87.2 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included
Source: 24-Bit Remaster

Somewhere betweem The Moody Blues, Marmalade and Crosby Stills and Nash, for a moment Parrish and Gurvitz may have been something, if perhaps with the involvement of George Martin as producer, they had not been unreasonably hailed as the new Beatles. Still, this classic song is completely forgotten, off every list, it’s not cool, hip, Prog, Psych, Psychedelic, Garage, sixties Pop, seventies underground and has no recognised virtuosos.


Having said that the line-up of the band is impressive. Paul Gurvitz was in The Gun with his brother Adrian, remember their 1968 hit Race With The Devil. The Gurvitz brothers went on to form Three Man Army and then teamed up with Ginger Baker for Baker Gurvitz Army in the seventies. Brian Parrish played with various small sixties bands (with Gurvitz), later joining Badger. Mike Kellie was with Spooky Tooth and other seventies luminaries before joining one of my favourite bands of the new wave era, The Only Ones, Rick Wills played with countless groups including Cochise, Roxy Music, Foreigner, latter Day Small Faces and Dave Gilmour. Micky Gallagher had played with Skip Bifferty and would eventually join Ian Dury as one of the Blockheads.

With George Martin choosing, producing and arranging Parrish And Gurvitz’s material, it’s not surprising that this opening track(s) from their one and only album is so good. Unfortunately The Beatles connection hindered their progress with that overpowering legend producing mild hysteria from the press. 

They were never able to live up to their producer’s previous affiliations but you might ask why were they called Parrish and Gurvitz instead of Gasoline Toothbrush or Camouflaged Meadow or Sadness In The Trees – anything but Parrish and Gurvitz – they sounded like they were solicitors. I imagine it’s because this wasn’t their first band – they’d played together before in various incarnations and as the two main members had got the support to make a record and then hired the band to play it live. 

Unfortunately the band was much heavier than the record and the US label lost interest as the band they signed was not the band they saw live. Brian Parrish then quit on the eve of a US tour due to personal problems and shortly thereafter they were gone.

So many records out there, hailed as genius, so many worthy records out there that are forgotten – this is one of them.

In 1971 The Gun broke up Paul Gurvitz started this act simply called Parrish & Gurvitz,(Brian Parrish, formerly of Badger), which was produced by George Martin.This was a one-off project on the Regal Zonophone label featuring the additional talents of Mike Kellie (ex-Spooky Tooth,Art), Micky Gallagher (pre-Ian Dury) and Rick Wills (pre-Foreigner).Lush production over beautiful crafted songs fully infused with the US west-coast sound.

The band was co-founded by keyboardist Tony Kaye after he left Yes, with David Foster. Foster had been in The Warriors with Jon Anderson before Anderson co-founded Yes. Foster later worked with the band on Time and a Word. Kaye had worked on a solo project by Foster that was never released.

The pair found drummer Roy Dyke, formerly of Ashton, Gardner & Dyke, and Dyke suggested Brian Parrish formerly of Parrish & Gurvitz which later became Frampton's Camel (after Parrish left P&G) on guitar. The new band began rehearsing in September 1972 and signed to Atlantic Records.

The group was formed by Adrian Gurvitz and Paul Gurvitz, formerly of The Gun. Following the band's dissolution, Adrian played with Buddy Miles and Paul played with Parrish & Gurvitz, then reunited as Three Man Army. Their debut album, A Third of a Lifetime, featured several drummers, including Miles, Carmine Appice (of Vanilla Fudge) and Mike Kellie (from Spooky Tooth). Tony Newman, who had previously played with Sounds Incorporated and Rod Stewart, joined for the group's next two albums, and a fourth album was planned but never recorded. Newman then left to play with David Bowie, and the Gurvitzes united with Ginger Baker as the Baker Gurvitz Army.

Rick Wills took his own form of music degree in Cambridge during the 1960s and has since gone on to become one of the most respected bass guitarists in the business. However, it was not one of the grand colleges of the famous university City which saw his graduation; instead, it was the local bars and village halls that provided the perfect place for him to take his first steps in the industry. 

The decision has proved to be a good one and during the years that have followed he has enjoyed success on both sides of the Atlantic, including 13 years as part of one of the world’s supergroups. 

After forming his first band called The Sundowners with a group of friends in the 1960s, Wills gained experience playing the local scene before being asked by another young Cambridge musician to form a new group. “His name was Dave Gilmour and even at that early stage you could see he had star potential,” claims Wills. “We called ourselves ‘Joker’s Wild’ and we had a great time for a few years playing in places like Spain and living in Paris, before Dave got the call to join Pink Floyd.” After moving to London Wills became part of Cochise and the group made three well thought of albums before they split and Wills, along with Mickey Gallagher and Mike Kellie, became part of the Parrish and Gurvitz band

01. Another Time, Another Day/Take What You Want — 4:40
02. It’s A Shame — 3:21
03. Libra — 4:00
04. I’ve Got Time — 3:48
05. Janine — 3:42
06. Dozy Gwen — 2:11
07. Why — 4:24
08. As If I Were Blind — 3:50
09. More Than Life — 3:43
10. Loving You — 7:14

1. Parrish and Gurvits
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2. Parrish and Gurvitz
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Thursday, 21 January 2016

David Bowie - Tower Theatre 1974-07-12 (Bootleg)


Size: 134 MB
Bitrate 256
mp3
Found in DC++ World

David Bowie was an English rock star known for dramatic musical transformations, including his character Ziggy Stardust. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996.

David Bowie was born in South London's Brixton neighborhood on January 8, 1947. His first hit was the song "Space Oddity" in 1969. The original pop chameleon, Bowie became a fantastical sci-fi character for his breakout Ziggy Stardust album. He later co-wrote "Fame" with John Lennon which became his first American No. 1 single in 1975. An accomplished actor, Bowie starred in The Man Who Fell to Earth in 1976. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996. Bowie died on January 10, 2016, from cancer at the age of 69.


David Bowie and Mick Ronson Ziggy Stardust tour, December 1972
Known as a musical chameleon for his ever-changing appearance and sound, David Bowie was born David Robert Jones in Brixton, South London, England, on January 8, 1947.

David showed an interest in music from an early age and began playing the saxophone at age 13. He was greatly influenced by his half-brother Terry, who was nine years older and exposed young David to the worlds of rock music and beat literature.

But Terry had his demons, and his mental illness, which forced the family to commit him to an institution, haunted David for a good deal of his life. Terry committed suicide in 1985, a tragedy that became the focal point of Bowie's later song, "Jump They Say."

After graduating from Bromley Technical High School at 16, David started working as a commercial artist. He also continued to play music, hooking up with a number of bands and leading a group himself called Davy Jones and the Lower Third. Several singles came out of this period, but nothing that gave the young performer the kind of commercial traction he needed.

Out of fear of being confused with Davy Jones of The Monkees, David changed his last name to Bowie, a name that was inspired by the knife developed by the 19th century American pioneer Jim Bowie.


David Bowie as Ziggy Stardust Aladdin Sane tour.
Eventually, Bowie went out on his own. But after recording an unsuccessful solo album, Bowie exited the music world for a temporary period. Like so much of his later life, these few years proved to be incredibly experimental for the young artist. For several weeks in 1967 he lived at a Buddhist monastery in Scotland. Bowie later started his own mime troupe called Feathers.

Around this time he also met the American-born Angela Barnett. The two married on March 20, 1970, and had one son together, whom they nicknamed "Zowie," in 1971, before divorcing in 1980. He is now known by his birth name Duncan Jones.

By early 1969, Bowie had returned full time to music. He signed a deal with Mercury Records and that summer released the single "Space Oddity." Bowie later said the song came to him after seeing Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. "I went stoned out of my mind to see the movie and it really freaked me out, especially the trip passage."

The song quickly resonated with the public, sparked in large part by the BBC's use of the single during its coverage of the Apollo 11 moon landing. The song enjoyed later success in the United States, when it was released in 1972 and climbed to number 15 on the charts.


David Bowie on Tour 1972
Bowie's next album, The Man Who Sold the World (1970), further catapulted him to stardom. The record offered up a heavier rock sound than anything Bowie had done before and included the song "All the Madmen," about his institutionalized brother, Terry. His next work, 1971's Hunky Dory, featured two hits: the title track that was a tribute to Andy Warhol, the Velvet Underground and Bob Dylan; and "Changes," which came to embody Bowie himself.

As Bowie's celebrity profile increased, so did his desire to keep fans and critics guessing. He claimed he was gay and then introduced the pop world to Ziggy Stardust, Bowie's imagining of a doomed rock star, and his backing group, The Spiders from Mars.

His 1972 album, The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, made him a superstar. Dressed in wild costumes that spoke of some kind of wild future, Bowie, portraying Stardust himself, signaled a new age in rock music, one that seemed to officially announce the end of the 1960s and the Woodstock era.


Lou Reed, Mick Jagger and David Bowie, Café Royale, 4th of July. 1973

But just as quickly as Bowie transformed himself into Stardust, he changed again. He leveraged his celebrity and produced albums for Lou Reed and Iggy Pop. In 1973, he disbanded the Spiders and shelved his Stardust persona. Bowie continued on in a similar glam rock style with the album Aladdin Sane (1973), which featured "The Jean Genie" and "Let's Spend the Night Together," his collaboration with Mick Jagger and Keith Richards.

Around this time he showed his affection for his early days in the English mod scene and released Pin Ups, an album filled with cover songs originally recorded by a host of popular bands, including Pretty Things and Pink Floyd.


David Bowie Advertise in US 1967
By the mid 1970s Bowie had undergone a full-scale makeover. Gone were the outrageous costumes and garish sets. In two short years he released the albums David Live (1974) and Young Americans (1975). The latter album featured backing vocals by a young Luther Vandross and included the song "Fame," co-written with John Lennon, which became Bowie’s first American number one single.

In 1980 Bowie, now living in New York, released Scary Monsters, a much-lauded album that featured the single "Ashes to Ashes," a sort of updated version of his earlier "Space Oddity."

Three years later Bowie recorded Let's Dance (1983), an album that contained a bevy of hits such as the title track, "Modern Love" and "China Girl," and featured the guitar work of Stevie Ray Vaughan.

Of course, Bowie's interests didn't just reside with music. His love of film helped land him the title role in The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976). In 1980, Bowie performed on Broadway in The Elephant Man.

Over the next decade, Bowie bounced back and forth between acting and music, with the latter especially suffering. Outside of a couple of modest hits, Bowie's musical career languished. His side project with musicians Reeve Gabrels and Tony and Hunt Sales known as Tin Machine released two albums Tin Machine (1989) and Tin Machine II (1991), which both proved to be flops. His much-hyped album Black Tie White Noise (1993), which Bowie described as a wedding gift to his new wife, supermodel Iman, also struggled to resonate with record buyers.


David Bowie as Ziggy Stardust for the Pin Ups album 1973
Oddly enough, the most popular Bowie creation of late has been Bowie Bonds, financial securities the artist himself backed with royalties from his pre-1990 work. Bowie issued the bonds in 1997 and earned $55 million from the sale. The rights to his back catalog were returned to him when the bonds matured in 2007.

In 2004 Bowie received a major health scare when he suffered a heart attack while onstage in Germany. He made a full recovery and went on to work with bands such as Arcade Fire and with the actress Scarlett Johansson on her album Anywhere I Lay My Head (2008), a collection of Tom Waits covers.

Bowie, who was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996, was a 2006 recipient of the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. He kept a low profile for several years until the release of his 2013 album The Next Day, which skyrocketed to number 2 on the Billboard charts. The following year, Bowie released a greatest hits collection Nothing Has Changed, which featured a new song "Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)."

In 2015, he collaborated on Lazarus, an Off-Broadway rock musical starring Michael C. Hall, which revisited his character from The Man Who Fell to Earth. 

He released Blackstar, his final album on January 8, 2016, his birthday. New York Times critic Jon Pareles noted that it was a "strange, daring and ultimately rewarding" work "with a mood darkened by bitter awareness of mortality." Only a few days later, the world would learn that the record had been made under difficult circumstances. 

The music icon died on January 10, 2016, two days after his 69th birthday. A post on his Facebook page read: “David Bowie died peacefully today surrounded by his family after a courageous 18 month battle with cancer."

He was survived by his wife Iman, his son Duncan Jones and daughter Alexandria, and his step-daughter Zulekha Haywood. Bowie also left behind an impressive musical legacy, which included 26 albums. His producer and friend Tony Visconti wrote on Facebook that his last record, Blackstar, was "his parting gift."

David Bowie - Tower Theatre, 
Philadelphia, Pa, July 12, 1974
Bootleg in excellent Sound-Qualitiy.

01. Knock On Wood (3:00)
02. Jean Genie (5:16)
03. Rebel Rebel (2:41)
04. Changes (3:20)
05. All The Young Dudes (3:50)
06. Diamond Dogs (6:25)
07. Big Brother (4:03)
08. Rock 'N' Roll Suicide (4:25)
09. Aladdin Sane (4:56)
10. 1984 (3:17)
11. Moonage Daydream (5:07)
12. Suffragette City (3:44)

1. David Bowie 1974
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2. David Bowie 1974
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David Bowie Advertise 1969

Monday, 18 January 2016

Rock Group Advertises for the day...


Adolf Hitler?

Atlantic Records?




The end for now.
(for 100% size, open picture in a new window)

Thursday, 14 January 2016

David Bowie - Absolutely Rare 1972-75 (Bootleg)


Size: 186 MB
Birate: 320
mp3
Found at OuterSpace
Artwork & Posters, etc. Included (Alot)

The cliché about David Bowie goes that he was a musical chameleon, adapting himself according to fashion and trends. While such a criticism is too glib, there's no denying that Bowie demonstrated a remarkable skill for perceiving musical trends at his peak in the '70s. After spending several years in the late '60s as a mod and as an all-around music hall entertainer, Bowie reinvented himself as a hippie singer/songwriter. Prior to his breakthrough in 1972, he recorded a proto-metal record and a pop/rock album, eventually redefining glam rock with his ambiguously sexy Ziggy Stardust persona. Ziggy made Bowie an international star, yet he wasn't content to continue to churn out glitter rock. By the mid-'70s, he'd developed an effete, sophisticated version of Philly soul that he dubbed "plastic soul," which eventually morphed into the eerie avant pop of 1976's Station to Station. Shortly afterward, he relocated to Berlin, where he recorded three experimental electronic albums with Brian Eno. 


At the dawn of the '80s, Bowie was still at the height of his powers, yet following his blockbuster dance-pop album Let's Dance in 1983, he slowly sank into mediocrity before salvaging his career in the early '90s. Even when he was out of fashion in the '80s and '90s, it was clear that Bowie was one of the most influential musicians in rock, for better and for worse. Each one of his phases in the '70s sparked a number of subgenres, including punk, new wave, goth rock, the new romantics, and electronica. Few rockers have ever had such lasting impact.

I Dig Everything: The 1966 Pye SinglesDavid Jones began performing music when he was 13 years old, learning the saxophone while he was at Bromley Technical High School; another pivotal event happened at the school, when his left pupil became permanently dilated in a schoolyard fight. Following his graduation at 16, he worked as a commercial artist while playing saxophone in a number of mod bands, including the King Bees, the Manish Boys (which also featured Jimmy Page as a session man), and Davey Jones & the Lower Third. All three of those bands released singles, which were generally ignored, yet he continued performing, changing his name to David Bowie in 1966 after the Monkees' Davy Jones became an international star. 


Over the course of 1966, he released three mod singles on Pye Records, which were all ignored. The following year, he signed with Deram, releasing the music hall, Anthony Newley-styled David Bowie that year. Upon completing the record, he spent several weeks in a Scottish Buddhist monastery. Once he left the monastery, he studied with Lindsay Kemp's mime troupe, forming his own mime company, the Feathers, in 1969. The Feathers were short-lived, and he formed the experimental art group Beckenham Arts Lab in 1969.

The Man Who Sold the WorldBowie needed to finance the Arts Lab, so he signed with Mercury Records that year and released Man of Words, Man of Music, a trippy singer/songwriter album featuring "Space Oddity." The song was released as a single and became a major hit in the U.K., convincing Bowie to concentrate on music. Hooking up with his old friend Marc Bolan, he began miming at some of Bolan's T. Rex concerts, eventually touring with Bolan, 
bassist/producer Tony Visconti, guitarist Mick Ronson, and drummer Cambridge as Hype. The band quickly fell apart, yet Bowie and Ronson remained close, working on the material that formed Bowie's next album, The Man Who Sold the World, as well as recruiting Michael "Woody" Woodmansey as their drummer. Produced by Tony Visconti, who also played bass, The Man Who Sold the World was a heavy guitar rock album that failed to gain much attention. Bowie followed the album in late 1971 with the pop/rock Hunky Dory, an album that featured Ronson and keyboardist Rick Wakeman.


The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars Following its release, Bowie began to develop his most famous incarnation, Ziggy Stardust: an androgynous, bisexual rock star from another planet. Before he unveiled Ziggy, Bowie claimed in a January 1972 interview with Melody Maker that he was gay, helping to stir interest in his forthcoming album. Taking cues from Bolan's stylish glam rock, Bowie dyed his hair orange and began wearing women's clothing. He called himself Ziggy Stardust, and his backing band -- Ronson, Woodmansey, and bassist Trevor Bolder -- were the Spiders from Mars. The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars was released with much fanfare in England in late 1972. The album and its lavish, theatrical concerts became a sensation throughout England, and helped him become the only glam rocker to carve out a niche in America. Ziggy Stardust became a word-of-mouth hit in the U.S., and the re-released "Space Oddity" -- which was now also the title of the re-released Man of Words, Man of Music -- reached the American Top 20. Bowie quickly followed Ziggy with Aladdin Sane later in 1973. Not only did he record a new album that year, but he also produced Lou Reed's Transformer, the Stooges' Raw Power, and Mott the Hoople's comeback All the Young Dudes, for which he also wrote the title track.


Pin Ups Given the amount of work Bowie packed into 1972 and 1973, it wasn't surprising that his relentless schedule began to catch up with him. After recording the all-covers Pin-Ups with the Spiders from Mars, he unexpectedly announced the band's breakup, as well as his retirement from live performances, during the group's final show that year. He retreated from the spotlight to work on a musical adaptation of George Orwell's 1984, but once he was denied the rights to the novel, he transformed the work into Diamond Dogs. The album was released to generally poor reviews in 1974, yet it generated the hit single "Rebel Rebel," and he supported the album with an elaborate and expensive American tour. As the tour progressed, Bowie became fascinated with soul music, eventually redesigning the entire show to reflect his new "plastic soul." Hiring guitarist Carlos Alomar as the band's leader, Bowie refashioned his group into a Philly soul band and recostumed himself in sophisticated, stylish fashions. The change took fans by surprise, as did the double-album David Live, which featured material recorded on the 1974 tour.


Young AmericansYoung Americans, released in 1975, was the culmination of Bowie's soul obsession, and it became his first major crossover hit, peaking in the American Top Ten and generating his first U.S. number one hit in "Fame," a song he co-wrote with John Lennon and Alomar. Bowie relocated to Los Angeles, where he earned his first movie role in Nicolas Roeg's The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976). While in L.A., he recorded Station to Station, which took the plastic soul of Young Americans into darker, avant-garde-tinged directions yet was also a huge hit, generating the Top Ten single "Golden Years." The album inaugurated Bowie's persona of the elegant "Thin White Duke," and it reflected Bowie's growing cocaine-fueled paranoia. Soon, he decided Los Angeles was too boring and returned to England; shortly after arriving back in London, he gave the awaiting crowd a Nazi salute, a signal of his growing, drug-addled detachment from reality. The incident caused enormous controversy, and Bowie left the country to settle in Berlin, where he lived and worked with Brian Eno.



Low Once in Berlin, Bowie sobered up and began painting, as well as studying art. He also developed a fascination with German electronic music, which Eno helped him fulfill on their first album together, Low. Released early in 1977, Low was a startling mixture of electronics, pop, and avant-garde technique. While it was greeted with mixed reviews at the time, it proved to be one of the most influential albums of the late '70s, as did its follow-up, Heroes, which followed that year. Not only did Bowie record two solo albums in 1977, but he also helmed Iggy Pop's comeback records The Idiot and Lust for Life, and toured anonymously as Pop's keyboardist. 


He resumed his acting career in 1977, appearing in Just a Gigolo with Marlene Dietrich and Kim Novak, as well as narrating Eugene Ormandy's version of Peter and the Wolf. Bowie returned to the stage in 1978, launching an international tour that was captured on the double-album Stage. In 1979, Bowie and Eno recorded Lodger in New York, Switzerland, and Berlin, releasing the album at the end of the year. Lodger was supported with several innovative videos, as was 1980's Scary Monsters, and these videos -- "DJ," "Fashion," "Ashes to Ashes" -- became staples on early MTV.

Scary Monsters was Bowie's last album for RCA, and it wrapped up his most innovative, productive period. Later in 1980, he performed the title role in the stage production of The Elephant Man, including several shows on Broadway. Over the next two years, he took an extended break from recording, appearing in Christiane F (1981) and the vampire movie The Hunger (1982), returning to the studio only for his 1981 collaboration with Queen, "Under Pressure," and the theme for Paul Schrader's remake of Cat People. In 1983, he signed an expensive contract with EMI Records and released Let's Dance. 



Bowie had recruited Chic guitarist Nile Rodgers to produce the album, giving the record a sleek, funky foundation, and hired the unknown Stevie Ray Vaughan as lead guitarist. Let's Dance became his most successful record, thanks to its stylish, innovative videos for "Let's Dance" and "China Girl," which turned both songs into Top Ten hits. Bowie supported the record with the sold-out arena tour Serious Moonlight.

Tonight Greeted with massive success for the first time, Bowie wasn't quite sure how to react, and he eventually decided to replicate Let's Dance with 1984's Tonight. While the album sold well, producing the Top Ten hit "Blue Jean," it received poor reviews and was ultimately a commercial disappointment. He stalled in 1985, recording a duet of Martha & the Vandellas' "Dancing in the Street" with Mick Jagger for Live Aid. He also spent more time jet-setting, appearing at celebrity events across the globe, and appeared in several movies -- Into the Night (1985), Absolute Beginners (1986), Labyrinth (1986) -- that turned out to be bombs. Bowie returned to recording in 1987 with the widely panned Never Let Me Down, supporting the album with the Glass Spider tour, which also received poor reviews. In 1989, he remastered his RCA catalog with Rykodisc for CD release, kicking off the series with the three-disc box Sound + Vision. Bowie supported the discs with an accompanying tour of the same name, claiming that he was retiring all of his older characters from performance following the tour. Sound + Vision was successful, and Ziggy Stardust re-charted amidst the hoopla.


Tin Machine IISound + Vision may have been a success, but Bowie's next project was perhaps his most unsuccessful. Picking up on the abrasive, dissonant rock of Sonic Youth and the Pixies, Bowie formed his own guitar rock combo, Tin Machine, with guitarist Reeves Gabrels, bassist Hunt Sales, and Hunt's brother, drummer Tony, who had previously worked on Iggy Pop's Lust for Life with Bowie. Tin Machine released an eponymous album to poor reviews that summer and supported it with a club tour, which was only moderately successful. Despite the poor reviews, Tin Machine released a second album, the appropriately titled Tin Machine II, in 1991, and it was completely ignored.
Black Tie White NoiseBowie returned to a solo career in 1993 with the sophisticated, soulful Black Tie White Noise, recording the album with Nile Rodgers and his by-then-permanent collaborator, Reeves Gabrels. 

The album was released on Savage, a subsidiary of RCA, and received positive reviews, but his new label went bankrupt shortly after its release, and the album disappeared. Black Tie White Noise was the first indication that Bowie was trying hard to resuscitate his career, as was the largely instrumental 1994 soundtrack The Buddha of Suburbia. In 1995, he reunited with Brian Eno for the wildly hyped, industrial rock-tinged Outside. Several critics hailed the album as a comeback, and Bowie supported it with a co-headlining tour with Nine Inch Nails in order to snag a younger, alternative audience, but his gambit failed; audiences left before Bowie's performance and Outside disappeared. He quickly returned to the studio in 1996, recording Earthling, an album heavily influenced by techno and drum'n'bass. Upon its early-1997 release, Earthling received generally positive reviews, yet the album failed to gain an audience, and many techno purists criticized Bowie for allegedly exploiting their subculture. hours... followed in 1999. In 2002, Bowie reunited with producer Toni Visconti and released Heathen to very positive reviews. He continued on with Visconti for Reality in 2003, which was once again warmly received.


Anywhere I Lay My HeadBowie supported Reality with a lengthy tour but it came to a halt in the summer of 2004 when he received an emergency angioplasty while in Hamburg, Germany. Following this health scare, Bowie quietly retreated from the public eye. Over the next few years, he popped up at the occasional charity concert or gala event and he sometimes sang in the studio for other artists (notably he appeared on Scarlett Johansson's Tom Waits tribute Anywhere I Lay My Head in 2008). Archival releases appeared but no new recordings did until he suddenly ended his unofficial retirement on his 66th birthday on January 8, 2013, releasing a new single called "Where Are We Now?" and announcing the arrival of a new album. 

Entitled The Next Day and once again produced by Visconti, the album was released in March of 2013. Greeted with generally positive reviews, The Next Day debuted at either number one or two throughout the world, earning gold certifications in many countries. The following year, Bowie released a new compilation called Nothing Has Changed, which featured the new song "Sue (Or in a Season of Crime)." This song turned out to be the cornerstone of Bowie's next project, Blackstar. Arriving on January 8, 2016, the album found Bowie re-teaming with Tony Visconti and exploring adventurous territory, as signaled by its lead single, "Blackstar." Just two days after its release, it was announced that David Bowie had died from liver cancer. In a Facebook post, Tony Visconti revealed that Bowie knew of his illness for at least 18 months and created Blackstar as "his parting gift" for us.

David Bowie - Absolutely Rare
New York, Carnegie Hall 28.09.1972 
London, Marquee Club 18-20-10.1973 
Young Americans outtakes & studio mixes.

The Music Hall, Boston on 10 January 1972

01. My Death

NBC Midnight Special at the Marquee, London on 18-20 October 1973
02. Sorrow
03. Time
04. Everything's Alright
05. Space Oddity
06. I Can't Explain
07. The Jean Genie
08. 1984-Dodo

With Marianne Faithfull
09. I Got You Babe

BBC Version: Special Dry Mix made for Top of the Pops broadcast in 1974
10. Rebel Rebel

With Lulu, original full length version recorded in late 1973
11. Dodo

Young Americans recording sessions in 1975
12. Can You Hear Me?
13. Right
14. Somebody Up There Likes Me

BBC Version: Another Dry Mix made for Top of the Pops in 1975
15. Golden Years

Part 1: Rare Bowie 1972-75
Part 2: Rare Bowie 1972-75
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Part 1: Rare Bowie 1972-75
Part 2: Rare Bowie 1972-75
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Part 1: Rare Bowie 1972-75
Part 2: Rare Bowie 1972-75
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Monday, 11 January 2016

Not to be missed: The Diddys Featuring Paige Douglas - Agony & Extasy (Superb Soul/Funk/Jazz Album US 1977)


Size: 112 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Artwork Included
Source: Japan 24-Bit Remaster

A very cool, really rare soul album from the Philly scene – one that was written, produced, and arranged by Hammond organist Charles Earland – but which is a sweet soul album with a really great feel! There's definitely a touch of Earland's keyboard work on the set – especially some of those non-organ lines he brought to his records for Mercury – and there's a jazzy groove that really sets The Diddys apart from other east coast groups of the time – a more complex approach to rhythm and instrumentation that almost makes some of the tunes feel as if they came from the James Mason side of the spectrum! The whole thing's wonderful – as unique as it is rare – and titles include "Intergalactic Love Song", "Strange Love", "Your Love Is Like A See Saw Baby", "How Long Have You Loved Him", and "My Special Love". CD features lots of bonus tracks – alternate takes of nearly every number on the record!


Rare groove Classic! Cult Soul album organist Charles Arland has left the world's first reprint. Masterpiece Cosmic Soul, which is known as Gilles Peterson FAVORITE "Intergalactic Love Song", there is no so much heart songs that are dissolved. The alternate mix of the world's first appearance it was 7 version add recording. Soul album with a fascinating a centripetal force in the rare album that was left on the small label Bam-Boo of Philadelphia. 

In jazz organist Charles Arland was produced in late 70's who had crowded blow the Cosmic Fusion album on Mercury work, I will think that those in the group name that relationship on a di Deeds of exclusive contract. Featuring the page Douglas made ​​male vocalist, and showcase original songs on the theme of LOVE in the whole volume. Cross Over, disco, boogie feeling and spacey effects are rare groove enough feeling. 

The Diddys featuring Paige Douglas and lifted from the Agony And Extasy album from 1977 produced by Charles Earland for the Bam Buu label. Soulful Disco Funk with tight drums and an overload of lead guitar and that killer vocal melody that will stick in your brain for weeks...

01. My Special Love (Disco Mix)
02. Intergalactic Love Song
03. I Love You Baby
04. My Special Love
05. Strange Love
06. Your Love Is Like A See-Saw Baby
07. I Love You Girl
08. How Long Have You Loved Him

Bonus Tracks:
09. My Special Love (Alternate Take)
10. Intergalactic Love Song (Alternate Take)
11. I Love You Baby (Alternate Take)
12. Strange Love (Alternate Take)
13. Your Love Is Like A See-Saw Baby (Alternate Take)
14. I Love You Girl (Alternate Take)
15. How Long Have You Loved Him (Alternate Take)

or
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Mini LP CD from Japan (Shout Records)

Thursday, 7 January 2016

Humble Pie - Hot 'N' Nasty, Rockin' The Winterland US 1973


Size: 153 MB
Bitrate: 256
mp3
Ripped by: ChrisGoesRock
Found in OuterSpace
Artwork Included

It must have been great to be a rock fan living in England in the late 1960s. London was swinging, and the British blues-rock scene was veritably exploding, thanks to the more sophisticated of the British invasion bands (most notably the Stones and the Yardbirds), who had first gotten the scene on its feet by incorporating a distinct blues element into their own respective pop music. Soon after, Cream, Free, Savoy Brown and the mighty Led Zeppelin took over and brought the fusion of traditional American blues and guitar-based hard rock to a whole new level.


And Humble Pie was at the forefront of the whole scene, one of the most compelling acts during one of rock's most exciting and creative periods. This live recording of Humble Pie was made at San Francisco's Winterland Ballroom in May of 1973, during what many consider to be the band's creative peak. This Winterland show, In addition to being only the fifth show recorded for the then brand-newly syndicated King Biscuit Flower Hour radio concert series, features a blistering set of material. From "I Don't Need No Doctor" to the infectious Top 10 hit "Hot 'N Nasty," this recording features all the essential music from the Humble Pie catalogue. And since the band built their reputation on legendary live shows, this King Biscuit collection is arguably better than anything the band ever did in the recording studio.

Humble Pie first came together on New Year's Eve, 1968/69. Marriott had just played a disastrous gig with The Small Faces, whose opening act, oddly enough, was Ridley's Spooky Tooth. Frampton had already left The Herd and was forming a new band with Shirley, a child prodigy drummer, who was only 16 at the time. Marriott called Shirley after the show and asked if he and Ridley could join the new band he and Frampton were assembling. According to Shirley, he couldn't believe a singer as acclaimed as Steve Marriott was even interested, and was "thrilled" at the prospect of what the new band could achieve.

The band made its debut in April of 1969, but almost collapsed at the onset. Despite the media hoopla surrounding their supergroup status and a slew of critical raves, Humble Pie's early albums (As Safe as Yesterday Is and Town and Country - both on Oldham's Immediate label) were not commercial hits. Marriott and Frampton couldn't decide if the band should move in an acoustic or electric direction, a dilemma that made the initial records hard to market. The band also had to hit the road before they really had time to work out their live show, and early tours were mostly lackluster as a result. Then, in 1970, the tides began to turn.


The band hired Dee Anthony as its manager, who promptly signed them to A&M Records. The band recorded Humble Pie and Rock On in 1970 and '71, respectively. Both albums forged the band into a solid - and very electric - blues/rock machine. The critics got behind the band en masse, and records began selling in large numbers. By the time the band had recorded and released Rockin' The Fillmore in 1971, the word had spread: Humble Pie was the hottest live band since the Jimi Hendrix Experience. 

Just then, Frampton decided he didn't feel comfortable in the band's hard rockin' blues direction and left to pursue a solo career. While the most memorable material from Rockin' The Fillmore ("I Don't Need No Doctor," "4 Day Creep" and the soulful remake of Ray Charles' "Hallelujah I Love Her So") also appear on this King Biscuit LP, but the versions differ dramatically, as Frampton had since been replaced by Dave "Clem" Clempson.

Though some in the rock press predicted the band's demise upon Frampton's departure, the opposite seemed to happen. Clempson revitalized the band, and helped take it in an even harder direction. When the band returned in 1972 with Smokin', they had become a well-oiled rock 'n' roll dynamo. Five of the album's tracks - "Hot 'N Nasty," "30 Days In The Hole," "Road Runner," "You're So Good For Me" and Eddie Cochran's classic "C'mon Everybody" - soon became radio staples. Smokin' became a multi-platinum Top 10 smash, and remains the best selling album of the band's career.

This concert was recorded while the band was promoting Eat It!, a double LP that featured three sides of studio songs and one side of live material. Though Eat It! went to the Top 15, and Humble Pie had firmly established themselves as a powerful live act, the band's powers (and their popularity) seemed to gradually decline following this tour. The band returned in 1974 with Thunderbox, but the constant focus by the media and the fans on Steve Marriott began taking its toll within the group. 

In 1975, Humble Pie reunited in the studio with ex-manager Andrew Oldham, and recorded Street Rats, a quirky collection of tracks, including three Beatles covers. The band embarked on a "Farewell" tour, and called it a day. Soon after the demise of Humble Pie, Marriott recruited Ridley for a solo album and tour, and in 1977 and 1978, participated in an unsuccessful Small Faces reunion. Clempson joined the Jack Bruce Band, and Shirley played with Natural Gas and Magnet, neither of which saw any real commercial success.

During 1970, Humble Pie switched to A&M Records and Dee Anthony became their manager. Anthony was focused on the US market and discarded the acoustic set, instigating a more raucous sound with Marriott as the front man. The group's first album for A&M, Humble Pie, was released later that year and alternated between progressive rock and hard rock. A single, "Big Black Dog", was released to coincide with the album and failed to chart, however the band was becoming known for popular live rock shows in the US. In 1971 Humble Pie released their most successful record to date Rock On as well as a live album recorded at the Fillmore East in New York entitled Performance Rockin' the Fillmore. The live album reached No. 21 on the US Billboard 200 and was certified gold by the RIAA. "I Don't Need No Doctor" was an FM radio hit in the US peaking at No. 73 on the Billboard Hot 100, propelling the album up the charts. But Frampton left the band by the time the album was released and went on to enjoy success as a solo artist.

Frampton was replaced by Dave "Clem" Clempson and Humble Pie moved towards a harder sound emphasizing Marriott's blues and soul roots. Their first record with Clempson, Smokin', was released in 1972, along with two singles "Hot 'n' Nasty" and "30 Days in the Hole." It was the band's most commercially successful record, and reached No. 6 on the US charts, helped by a busy touring schedule. After the success of Smokin' the
band's record label A&M released Humble Pie's first two Immediate albums in one double album, as Lost and Found. The marketing ploy was a success and the album charted at No. 37 on the Billboard 200. Looking for a more authentic R&B sound, Marriott hired three female backing vocalists, 'The Blackberries'. 

The trio consisted of Venetta Fields, Clydie King and Sherlie Matthews who was later replaced by Billie Barnum. They had performed with Ike and Tina Turner as The Ikettes and with Ray Charles as The Raelettes. This new line-up included Sidney George on saxophone for the recording of Eat It, a double album released in 1973 made up of Marriott originals (some acoustic), R&B covers, and a Humble Pie concert recorded in Glasgow. The album peaked at No. 13 in the US charts. Thunderbox was released in 1974, and Street Rats a year later. In 1975, joined by keyboardist Tim Hinkley, Humble Pie conducted their 'Goodbye Pie Tour' before disbanding.

Lineups:
Steve Marriott - guitar, vocals, keyboards, harmonica
 Clem Clempson - guitar, vocals, keyboards
 Greg Ridley - bass, vocals, guitar
 Jerry Shirley - drums, keyboards

01. Up Your Sleeves 03:58
02. 4-Day Creep 03:35
03. C'mon Everybody 07:22
04. Honky Tonk Women 06:38
05. Stone Cold Fever 01:07
06. I Believe to My Soul 05:21
07. Thirty Days in a Hole 07:49
08. (I'm a) Road Runner 12:28
09. Hallelujah (I Love Her So) 07:36
10. I Don't Need No Doctor 13:05
11. Hot n' Nasty 07:21

1. Humble Pie 1973
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2. Humble Pie 1973
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3. Humble Pie
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