Saturday, 8 March 2014

Bob Dylan - Scorpio Genuine Live 1966 (8CD Boxed Set) (Bootleg)



Size: 1.3 GB
Bitrate: 320
mp3
Found in my car today!!
Some Artwork

Bob Dylan 
Genuine Live 1966 
Scorpio 8 CD Box Set

This incredible 8 CD box set from Scorpio is the ultimate documentation of the 1966 world tour. The sound quality is as good as the best known recordings. The package itself warrants owning this visual stunner. Always at the top of the game, Scorpio adds this crown jewel into their already impressive catalog. The covers are  all rare period photos and images that have to be seen to be believed. Each of the 8 discs slips into a cardboard sleeve not unlike a vinyl LP jacket. 

The jacket then slips into a gatefold cardboard cover. The covers bear a logo altered from the old CBS 'eye' logo. Each of the five covers are presented as a set, with individual names, photos and graphics. The individual CDs can be seen by clicking on the name of each one at right. The entire set comes housed in a fabulous looking cardboard box with a great photo cover and a gold foil sticker. 

The CDs are gold, each with a different color ink that touts 'Robert and the Hawks', along with the tracks. As well as a lone wolf logo, Scorpio has borrowed another logo for the CD design ... a 'Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab' type logo emblazoned on the left side of each disc lends a touch of class. All of this over the top excess would make any collector drool, ...but it doesn't stop there. Scorpio has also included two full color tour booklets, 3 vintage looking black and white postcards. And a jaw dropping fold out 9½" x 14½" poster. You can see it full size by clicking the thumbnail at right. This extravagant set will be one of the highlights of any size collection.


A Phoenix In April Sydney Stadium, Sydney, Australia  April 13, 1966:
The Sydney show is a raw and powerful soundboard recording. It is surprisingly quite for being an analog recording from such an early show. Dylan is talkative between a few of the first songs of each set in the slow, stoned voice that typified this tour. The first disc contains the acoustic show. The first song cuts in, and the tape speed runs off for a second. The mic windscreen (pop filter) does not work well throughout the show. On Visions Of Johanna, virtually every line has a word that pops. It's not as bad on Fourth Time Around, which contains a momentary feedback. It returns on each "Baby Blue". On the solo of Desolation Row, Dylan plays a series of triplets on the guitar in double time, and blows a slide on the harp to compliment it for a strange effect that probably worked better live than it does on tape. The second disc is the electric set. The music is well mixed, but the vocals completely overpower it. Of course, because of the nature of the harder singing on this set, the pop filter is much more problematic. Dylan introduces Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues with a bizarre faux meaning of the song. The pop filter becomes so ineffective, that on some verses of LeopardSkin PillBox Hat, every word pops The highlight of the electric set is an erie, laid back Ballad Of A Thin Man that makes use of dynamics, and a play between the vocals and organ. All in all, this is a great recording. The sound is bright and full, and as good as the best know tapes. The discs are a tad short at 48 minutes each, but the overall package wouldn't have work so well by using filler material. The cover stays with the black, white, and red theme of the official Bootleg Vol. 4 release. The CDs were copied by Orange and released as a double entitled 

Disc one 
01. She Belongs To Me 
02. Fourth Time Around 
03. Visions Of Johanna 
04. It's All Over Now Baby Blue 
05. Desolation Row 
06. Just Like A Woman 
07. Mr. Tambourine Man

Disc two 
01. Tell Me Momma 
02. I Don't Believe You 
03. Baby Let Me Follow You Down 
04. Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues 
05. LeopardSkin PillBox Hat 
06. One Too Many Mornings 
07. Ballad Of A Thin Man 
08. Positively Fourth Street



The Children's Crusade Festival Hall, Melbourne, Australia  April 20, 1966:
As with most performances of this tour, Dylan sings the first 6 songs solo with the acoustic guitar. For this show he uses a borrowed guitar, as his had been broken. When compared to the Sydney show, this performance is more laid back. This recording has a higher analogue tape white noise floor level, but the windscreen is effective at this show, and there are few mic pops. She Belongs To Me cuts in after the song has begun The band kicks in for electrified versions of the final 3. The overall sound on this recording is quite good. All members of what would be The Band are now in place, except for Levon Helm. On this show, Mickey Jones plays drums. Dylan introduces Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues with a fanciful story about a Mexican Painter, and two girls begin screaming wildly at the prospect of their idol singing their favorite song. Half of the show was broadcast on channel 9 TV South Australia in January 1967, and has been available ever since as a mono recording. The tape here is purported to be a stereo soundboard recording, but it is re-channeled or 'created' stereo. Keep in mind that even the soundboard tapes of the European tour that followed were only 3 tracks. There were two machines in use, but this was not for extra tracks or for a stereo effect. Technology of the day dictated two machines starting a different times to prevent music loss in the event of tape run out. The Aussie shows were mono line feed recorded from the film crew. Mr. Tambourine Man was performed as well, but only a fragment was recorded. Without it, the show clocks in at 57 minutes. Ten minutes of the Adelaide press conference were added to round it out. The original CD release of this show was 1988's 'Bob Dylan's Dream Vol.1'. It was merely recorded from vinyl, however, and the electric portion suffered the fate of being a weak mono TV broadcast tape. The cover illustration is from a 1966 edition of The New Yorker that included a Dylan article of the same title written by Ralph Gleason.

01. She Belongs To Me  
02. Fourth Time Around 
03. Visions Of Johanna (Mother Revisited) 
04. It's All Over Now Baby Blue 
05. Desolation Row 
06. Just Like A Woman 
07. Tell Me Momma 
08. Baby Let Me Follow You Down 
09. Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues & Inteview * 

*Adelaide, Australia interview 10 minutes April 22, 1966

While Establishment Burns Adelphi Theatre, Dublin, Ireland May 5, 1966:
Six of the seven songs that were recorded at the Adelphi Theatre have been available to vinyl LP boot collectors for many years. They first appeared on CD in 1988 as 'Dublin May,5 1966'. They are not quite the quality as some of the other shows, but they are still very good. The problems include a  As it was an incomplete recording, Scorpio has rounded out the disc with some of the wildest performances of the tour. Great quality as well. These 3 songs are the only known surviving board recordings of their respective shows except for ABC's I Don't Believe You, which was officially released on Biograph.. These push the listening time to 65 minutes. There have been rumours since the 1960s of an unreleased Dylan song by the title of While The Establishment Burns. It was also the name of a fairly rare 1970 bootleg LP release. 

01. Visions Of Johanna 
02. Fourth Time Around 
03. It's All Over Now Baby Blue 
04. Desolation Row 
05. Just Like A Woman 
06. Mr. Tambourine Man 
07. I Don't Believe You 
08. Ballad Of A Thin Man** 
09. One Too Many Mornings* 
10. Like A Rolling Stone* 

sources:  
Adelphi Theatre, Dublin, Ireland May 5, 1966 
** KB Hallen, Copenhagen, Denmark May 1, 1966 
*ABC Theatre, Edinburgh, Scotland May 20, 1966


A Nightly Ritual Odeon Theatre, Liverpool, UK May 14, 1966:
If not the best sounding recording, Liverpool is as good a performance of the electric set as you will find on the tour. Perhaps inspired by playing the hometown of the Fab Four, the band is tight and powerful. Dylan's vocals, Robbie's lead guitar playing and Garth's erie B-3 all seem truly inspired. This board tape is of a remarkable effort. The first track was used as a demo of the song by Dwarf music. The second track appeared on a 1966 single, and on the official CBSCD Masterpieces. Dylan starts his now famous mumbling ruse before the introduction of LeopardSkin PillBox Hat, as the blue collar audience becomes a little loud with their heckling. Ballad Of A Thin Man is the highlight of the night. Glasgow is interesting tracks of songs that Bob was working on that were recorded for use in the film Eat The Document. The sound quality is amazing. The Sheffield show is perhaps the best of the tour. The quality is incredible, and the performance can move you to tears. The Gaumont adds a warmth and depth to the overall sound that is lacking at many venues, and Bob pours his heart into every syllable. This set represents some of the finest of the tour and, arguably, the best of this entire collection. The title of this set comes from the number of shows that were packed into the month of May (night after night) to make the European tour profitable. 

Disc one 
Liverpool: 
01. Tell Me Momma 
02. I Don't Believe You 
03. Baby Let Me Follow You Down 
04. Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues 
05. LeopardSkin PillBox Hat 
06. One Too Many Mornings 
07. Ballad Of A Thin Man 
08. Like A Rolling Stone 
Glasgow: 
09. What Kind of Friend Is This 
10. I Can't Leave Her Behind 
11. I Can't Leave Her Behind 
12. Does She Need Me 

Disc two 
Sheffield: 
01. She Belongs To Me 
02. Fourth Time Around 
03. Visions Of Johanna 
04. It's All Over Now Baby Blue 
05. Desolation Row 
06. Just Like A Woman 
07. Mr. Tambourine Man 
08. LeopardSkin PillBox Hat 
09. One Too Many Mornings 
10. Ballad Of A Thin Man* 

Sources: 
Odeon Theatre, Liverpool, UK May 14, 1966 
Glasgow Hotel Tape, Scotland  May 19, 1966 
Gaumont Theatre, Sheffield, UK May 16, 1966 
*Odeon Theatre, Birmingham, UK May 12, 1966 


Genuine RAH Concerts Free Trade Hall, Manchester, UK  May 17, Royal Albert Hall, London, UK  May 26, Royal Albert Hall, London, UK  May 27, 1966:

The Manchester show is moot now with the release of the official album, but this actually has a slightly softer, more polished sound. This CD is most likely the correct order and venues of what has traditionally been a very confusing and inaccurate account of the performances in the bootleg community. These represent clean, quiet recordings... although they have been available to collectors for so long that it's almost hard to get excited about them. If you're new to collecting, by all means, this is required material ... and in as good a quality as you are likely to find. Unfortunately, with all these wondrful soundboard tapes that were presented in this exhaustive set... the manufacturer has resorted to presenting a copy of this show that was recorded from vinyl. There's vinyl noise throughout. Because this show was usually booted to vinyl in great quality, this is still a pleasant listening expierence. Old timers will find this recording strangely comforting, for those raised in the CD era, swallow your pride... you will not die, it's not poison. You might even find it a little warmer sounding than what you've been used to hearing. At the final tracck of disc one, we magically switch to a pristien tape source. We get to hear a rarity on the tour... Bob introduces The Band. Then he kicks into the highlight of disc one... a paifully slow Like A Rolling Stone in which Bob spits words at the crowd with venom, and drags them into eternity. On disc 2 we resume with the vinyl. 

Disc one 
Manchester: 
01. She Belongs To Me 
02. Fourth Time Around 
03. Visions Of Johanna 
04. It's All Over Now Baby Blue 
05. Desolation Row (cuts out) 
London, May 26: 
06. She Belongs To Me (looses vol. for few seconds) 
07. Fourth Time Around 
08. Visions Of Johanna 
09. LeopardSkin PillBox Hat 
10. One Too Many Mornings 
11. Ballad Of A Thin Man 
12. Like A Rolling Stone

Disc two 
London, May 27: 
01. She Belongs To Me 
02. Fourth Time Around 
03. Visions Of Johanna 
04. It's All Over Now Baby Blue 
05. Desolation Row 
06. Just Like A Woman 
07. Mr. Tambourine Man 
08. Interview and listener calls * (10 minutes)

sources: 
Free Trade Hall, Manchester, UK  May 17, 1966 
Royal Albert Hall, London, UK  May 26, 1966 
Royal Albert Hall, London, UK  May 27, 1966 
*Bob Fass Show (WBAI-FM, NY); January 26, '66

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Sunday, 2 March 2014

Fairport Convention - Live 1970-05-27 and 1970-08-30 (Bootleg)


Size: 278 MB
Bitrate: 320
mp3
Found in DC++ World
Some Artwork Included

The best British folk-rock band of the late '60s, Fairport Convention did more than any other act to develop a truly British variation on the folk-rock prototype by drawing upon traditional material and styles indigenous to the British Isles. While the revved-up renditions of traditional British folk tunes drew the most critical attention, the group members were also (at least at the outset) talented songwriters as well as interpreters. They were comfortable with conventional harmony-based folk-rock as well as tunes that drew upon more explicitly traditional sources, and boasted some of the best singers and instrumentalists of the day. A revolving door of personnel changes, however, saw the exit of their most distinguished talents, and basically changed the band into a living museum piece after the early '70s, albeit an enjoyable one with integrity.

When Fairport formed around 1967, their goal was not to revive British folk numbers, but to play harmony- and guitar-based folk-rock in a style strongly influenced by Californian groups of the day (especially the Byrds). The lineup that recorded their self-titled debut album in 1968 featured Richard Thompson, Ian Matthews, and Simon Nicol on guitars; Ashley Hutchings on bass; Judy Dyble on vocals; and Martin Lamble on drums. Most of the members sang, though Matthews and Dyble were the strongest vocalists in this early incarnation; all of their early work, in fact, was characterized by blends of male and female vocals, influenced by such American acts as the Mamas & the Papas and Ian & Sylvia. While their first album was derivative, it had some fine material, and the band was already showing a knack for eclecticism, excavating overlooked songs by Joni Mitchell (then virtually unknown) and Emitt Rhodes.

What We Did on Our HolidaysFairport Convention didn't reach their peak until Dyble was replaced after the first album in 1968 by Sandy Denny, who had previously recorded both as a solo act and with the Strawbs. Denny's penetrating, resonant style qualified her as the best British folk-rock singer of all time, and provided Fairport with the best vocalist they would ever have. What We Did on Our Holidays (1969) and Unhalfbricking (1969) are their best albums, mixing strong originals, excellent covers of contemporary folk-rock songs by the likes of Mitchell and Dylan, and imaginative revivals of traditional folk songs that mixed electric and acoustic instruments with a beguiling ease.

Liege & LiefMatthews had left the band in early 1969, and Lamble (still in his teens) died in an accident involving the group's equipment van in mid-1969. That forced Fairport to regroup, replacing Lamble with Dave Mattacks, and adding Dave Swarbrick on fiddle. Their repertoire, too, became much more traditional in focus, and electrified traditional folk numbers would dominate their next album, Liege and Lief (1969). Here critical thought diverges; some insist that this is unequivocally their peak, marking a final escape from their '60s folk-rock influences into a much more original style. This school of thought severely underestimates their songwriting talents, and others feel that they were at their best when mixing original and outside material, and contemporary and traditional styles, in fact becoming more predictable and derivative when they opted to concentrate on British folk chestnuts.

Full House The Liege and Lief lineup didn't last long; by the end of the '60s, Ashley Hutchings had left to join Steeleye Span, replaced by Dave Pegg. More crucially, Denny was also gone, helping to form Fotheringay. Thompson was still on board for Full House (1970), but by the beginning of 1971 he too had departed, leaving Nicol as the only original member.

Angel DelightFairport have kept going, on and off (mostly on), for the last 25 years, touring and performing frequently. It may be too harsh to dismiss all of their post-Thompson records out of hand; Angel Delight (1971), the first recorded without the guitarist on board, was actually their highest-charting LP in the U.K., reaching the Top Ten. Nicol's exit in late 1971 erased all vestiges of connections to their salad days. Fairport was now not so much a continuous entity as a concept, carried on by musicians dedicated to the electrified British folk style that had been mapped out on Liege and Lief.
So it continues to this day, supported by a devoted fan base (Dirty Linen, the top American roots music magazine, originally began as a Fairport Convention fanzine). 

Denny would actually return to the group for about a year and a half in the 1970s, prior to her death in 1978; Nicol rejoined in 1976. Keeping track of Fairport's multitudinous lineup changes is a daunting task, and the group has coexisted on an erratic basis with the various other projects of the most frequent members (Nicol, Mattacks, and Pegg, the last of whom has played with Jethro Tull since the late '70s). They played annual reunion concerts during the 1980s and '90s (sometimes joined on-stage by Fairport alumni like Thompson), events that turned into some of the most popular folk festivals in Europe. They've also released some albums of new material intermittently throughout the last couple of decades, mostly pleasant, unexceptional traditional-oriented outings that appeal primarily to diehards.

The most distinguished graduates of Fairport, however, have continued to shape the British folk and folk-rock scene with notable solo and group projects. Richard Thompson is one of the most critically acclaimed singer/songwriters in the world; Ian Matthews made some interesting recordings as a solo act and with Plainsong and Matthews Southern Comfort; Denny sang with Fotheringay and released several solo albums before her death; and Hutchings carried on the most traditional face of British folk-rock with Steeleye Span, the Albion Band, and the Etchingham Steam Band.

Fairport Convention
1970-05-27
Mandel Hall, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
FM broadcast (WHPK-FM)     

Richard Thompson - lead guitar, vocals
 Simon Nicol - rhythym guitar, bass, vocals
Dave Swarbrick - violin, mandolin, vocals
 Dave Pegg - bass, mandolin
 Dave Mattacks - drums

01. Walk Awhile  07:38
02. Lark In The Morning > Rakish Patty > The Foxhunter's Jig > Toss The Feathers  04:11
03. Matty Groves  14:08
04. The Deserter  07:17
05. Dirty Linen > Paddy On The Railroad > Drops Of Brandy > O'Carolan's Concerto  05:09
06. Sloth  11:43
07. Drum solo > Lucy > Flatback Caper  10:52
08. Tam Lin  11:27
09. Sir Patrick Spens  04:56

Fairport Convention
Philadelphia Folk Festival
Old Farm, Schwenksville, PA
FM Broadcast 1970-08-30

 Dave Swarbrick - fiddle, vocals
 Richard Thompson - guitar, vocals
 Simon Nicol - guitar, vocals
 Dave Pegg - bass, vocals
 Dave Mattacks - drums

01. Walk Awhile  06:22
02. Dirty Linen  05:21
03. Lark in the Morning  06:03
04. Sloth  11:38
05. Banks of the Sweet Primroses  05:05
06. Sir Patrick Spens  05:12
07. Jenny's Chickens/The Mason's Apron  04:15

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